In respect to the upcoming holidays, there’s probably going to be a lot of parties coming up. What goes better with the holidays than gingerbread? And you can’t forget to stay medicated. Everyone gets a little stressed during these festive months, right? This way, you can seem like you’ve got some holiday cheer, when in reality, you’re getting super stoned.
“My parents were a great introduction to the rest of the world, basically,” says Sayegh, who hopes that finely prepared food combined with the capacity to discuss the molecular structure of cannabis will help strip away the stigma of a plant still federally classified alongside heroin as a Schedule I drug. Far from a scourge, Sayegh and others see immense medical and economic potential in the herb.
If you’re new to preparing food with pot, you might as well start with a cookbook that has the word “easy” in the title. Author Cheri Sicard ran a popular recipe website for years, so it was a natural transition for this marijuana activist to write a cannabis cookbook. The Daily Beast once called her the “Martha Steward of Weed,” and until Stewart herself writes a book — and really, we all know it’s coming — “The Easy Cannabis Cookbook” will do nicely. Sicard thinks marijuana is the “unsung superfood,” and adds it to everything from apple-stuffed pork chops to lemon blueberry scones.

To smoke hash oil with a spliff, add the hash oil when rolling on top of the herbal weed.  This is a good way to add a kick to cheap pot.  It may take some practice to get it smoking properly.  It’s also possible to add on top of the weed in a bowl.  Dab it on to the side of the bowl to avoid it saturating the intake, but not too close to the side as to miss the weed, as pure oil is more likely to catch fire.  You want it between the intake and the bowl edge, on top of the weed.
I love using my Instant Pot to make marijuana butter, as there is almost no smell while it is cooking. Follow the directions on this page, using the Instant Pot’s slow cooker setting (I usually use the high setting, you could also use the medium setting, personal preference). I guess you could pressure cook it, but temps are hotter and the bits of plant material are the types of things that love to clog pressure cooker valves, so I prefer to use the slow cooker setting instead of the Pressure cooking setting. So follow the slow cooker instructions at the link below and you are good to go.

The recipes on this site are calculated on using a 1/2 ounce to 1 cup butter, which in most cases will be pretty strong (depending on the strength of the cannabis of course). When cooking for myself, I will often double that. Also making stronger infusions let’s you use less of them to get the same dose, which can improve flavor. So amounts are a suggestion and cannabis cooks should always take the amounts given in ANY recipe with a grain of salt and adjust upwards or downwards according to their own needs. My free dosing class can help you do that.
Medical marijuana is used to treat a variety of issues including chronic pain, childhood epilepsy, and muscle control problems.[1] While consumption of cannabinoids is often accomplished by smoking, eating medical marijuana is typically the preferred method.[2] However, cooking marijuana is not as simple as throwing pot leaves into your brownie mix. You must first create marijuana infused ingredients. Cooking with medical marijuana is then as simple as substituting a marijuana infused ingredient for a regular one.
The wake and bake is the most important part of the stoner morning. Without a proper wake and bake, the poor pothead can’t go about their day. So in case you don’t have time to smoke and eat, it’s highly recommended that you eat. But just in case you want to get high while you eat, you can make these super easy wake and bake sandwiches that will fill your stomach and get you perfectly medicated.

Great recipe choices and I like the dosage information. The book has clear explanations of the correct mindset to have when cooking with Cannabis, take it slow, It's an attractive book with the content I want. The recipes are more like comfort food to me, but I like that. Somebody stated in a review that the recipes were weak. They are supposed to be. There are too many variable that change the effect: quality of product, tolerance of the person consuming the food, etc. Cooking is about enjoying the food and experience, not getting blasted. It's not cool to lose control. Anyway, great content and great approach to the subject matter. Thank you, High Times.
Alternately, you can do your straining through cheesecloth. Use multiple layers for more filtration. Put your cheesecloth over the top of a large mixing bowl. Secure the sides with a rubber band. Pour the mixture into the bowl. If you can get cheesecloth, this method is often preferred because you can filter more at a time than you can with a coffee strainer.

One of the newest ways people are enjoying cannabis is by combining it with cocktails and mocktails. This is especially popular at dinner parties in the any states where cannabis has recently become legal for recreation. But, with a strong taste and a particular method of infusion necessary, beginners may not know how best to make cannabis cocktails. This book has a collection of 75 cannabis drink recipes by “The Cocktail Whisperer” Warren Bobrow. It also includes a full history of cannabis as a social and medicinal drug. You will find recipes not only for cocktails but for shrubs, bitters, butters, oils and even coffee, tea and milk-based drinks for the morning hours. This is a really fun book for anyone who loves drinks and cannabis.
Wolf’s mixed nuts have had a lot of traction. She adapted them from a Danny Meyer recipe and added infused coconut oil, a staple in her kitchen because it can also be used topically, “so you’re getting more bang for your buck.” (An elderly friend of Wolf’s rubs it on his hands to treat his rheumatoid arthritis.) Wolf’s newest book, “Cooking with Cannabis,” emphasizes comfort foods like mac and cheese and meatloaf. There’s a chapter called “Recipes for One,” intended for solo eaters. “It’s great to be able to make yourself ramen,” she said. (The cannabis goes in the broth, mixed with sesame oil.)
Alice B. Toklas, who presided over literary salons in early twentieth-century Paris with partner Gertrude Stein, firmly ensconced the practice of cooking and eating cannabis in the cultural imagination with The Alice B. Toklas Cook Book. First published in 1954, it offered up a recipe for Hashish Fudge, which “anyone could whip up on a rainy day.” In addition to pulverizing a “bunch of cannabis sativa,” the recipe calls for black peppercorns, dried figs, and peanuts. In an introduction to the 1984 reprint of the book, food writer M.F.K. Fisher wrote that she had never tried one of the fudge brownies, but “am told they taste slightly bitter.” These days, no cannabis chef worth their herb would recommend throwing raw product into baked goods, but brownies can be an ideal vehicle for THC. It just takes a few more steps than Toklas imagined.
Similarly to preparing other recipes, it is rather important that you pay close attention to the measurements and weights that medical marijuana recipes require. If you are a beginner at preparing weed recipes, be sure to use no more than one ounce of premium quality marijuana per recipe. As you practice making these recipes and have discovered what potency of weed works best for you, you can up the amounts you use to cook.
 Next, fill a large pan with the vegetable oil and let that get nice and hot. Remember to be careful when handling hot oi,l it has a tendancy to be mean and pop around when it’s hot. You’ll know the oil is the right temperature if you put a small drop of batter in, and it starts to sizzle and turn brown, now it’s ready to start cooking your special bananas.
Cut the top 1/2 inch off the garlic heads. Add olive oil to the cut heads and sprinkle with basil. Roast in 420-degree oven for 30-50 minutes. The garlic is done when tender to a fork. Boil the cubed potatoes in salted water until fork tender, drain, and mash lightly. Add butters to potatoes and continue to mash. Add pepper, salt, cream, and cheese and mash until smooth. Squeeze garlic into the mix and whip until smooth.
If you’ve experimented with other forms of cannabis before, your sensitivity to THC is a key factor in what kind of oil to choose. If you enjoy the typical “high”, picking a THC-rich oil would kick that up a notch, whereas oils with higher concentrations of CBD often have reduced THC values and therefore feel more toned down. It’s recommended that most people start with a CBD-rich oil or an evenly balanced CBD-THC oil, observe, and then gradually increase the amount of THC. 
Take the muffin pan (spray it with some Pam first so your treats don’t get stuck) and put a cookie’s worth amount of cookie dough at the bottom of each one. Kind of smush them flat so that they cover the bottom. Take a single Reese’s and place it on top of each of the cookies. Finally, pour the brownie mix in to each muffin so that it fills the little cup about halfway or until you’ve used all of the brownie mix. Either one works. The end result can either be a huge treat or a small one, depending on the amount of brownie that you use.
The hard crunchy texture of paunut brittle is like candy and great for continuous munching throughout the day. The peanuts mixed with the cannabis can also act as a brain booster and wouldn’t be a bad idea for a snack if you’ve got some thinking planned somewhere in your day. This is one of those high treats that’s so easy to keep eating and before you know it you’ve got this beautiful buzz going on, some pretty amazing brittle. Learn How to Make Marijuana Peanut Brittle!

Pour 12 doses of cannabis oil into a measuring cup at least 1 cup in size. Once the cannabis oil has been added, top it up with the melted coconut oil until you have a total of 3/4 cup of coconut oil and cannabis oil combined. Whisk the cannabis-coconut oil combination thoroughly to make sure that the cannabis has been evenly distributed into the coconut oil. This is a very important step to ensure that each muffin has equal doses of cannabis. Add the cannabis-coconut oil combination to the wet ingredients (large bowl) and whisk together ingredients, making sure to evenly mix the cannabis-coconut oil into the wet ingredients.


Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.
Decarboxylation: Ingesting or cooking with fresh cannabis will not have much of an effect because the THC has to be “activated” with heat. This process is called decarboxylation, or “decarbing.” Typically, THC is decarboxylated before cooking in order to produce the effects of cannabis. It is worth noting that it must be heated slowly in order to retain any product for the cooking process.
Squeeze and pat dry your thawed wings until you have them as dry as you can get them. Combine all of your dry ingredients (salt, garlic powder, cayenne pepper, onion powder, paprika, pepper, and flour) into a gallon sized sealable plastic bag. Once you have all the dry ingredients mixed in your plastic sealable bag add your wings, seal the bags, and toss until the wings are evenly coated with your flour mixture. Now place your coated wings on a cookie sheet, cover with plastic wrap or aluminum foil and refrigerate for a minimum of one hour. This step can be done the night before which is awesome!
We pulled up to Wolf’s “office,” a commercial kitchen called the Bitchin’ Kitchen, which was home to seventeen edible-marijuana startups. It has industrial-sized ovens, steel countertops, and a walk-in refrigerator with a vault door. Wolf opened a freezer to show me seventeen pounds of marijuana-infused butter. She and Mary made a fresh batch every week.
I love using my Instant Pot to make marijuana butter, as there is almost no smell while it is cooking. Follow the directions on this page, using the Instant Pot’s slow cooker setting (I usually use the high setting, you could also use the medium setting, personal preference). I guess you could pressure cook it, but temps are hotter and the bits of plant material are the types of things that love to clog pressure cooker valves, so I prefer to use the slow cooker setting instead of the Pressure cooking setting. So follow the slow cooker instructions at the link below and you are good to go.
Let's just say you took your weed and put it into a crock pot, like a lot of people do, with some butter, oil, and water and let it simmer. What you're really doing, in addition to simmering all of those cannabinoids into the butter and oil, is also adding in any impurities that are in that bud. So anything that tastes really bad could be something as horrible as insecticides, or it could just be the chlorophyl, which also has a specific taste that's pretty powerful.
“I cook for a lot of sick people out there,” he says. “I don’t charge to do this. They acquire the cannabis, and I’ll go there and cook a meal for them. The most important thing is, when I go and cook, I teach them how to do it themselves. Because I can’t feed everybody on a constant basis, and for a lot of people, this is not recreational. This is a lifestyle change they’re making, that they can actually use cannabis they’ve been prescribed for medicinal purposes.”
Hamilton Beach makes a line of slow cookers (pictured in this article) that are great for reducing cooking odors when making marijuana oil.  I am sure the fine folks at Hamilton Beach did not design the Stay and Go Slow Cooker for this specific purpose, but nonetheless they work great. That’s because it has a rubber gasket on the lid and a clamp you can use to keep the slow cooker tightly closed.  People going to pot luck suppers (no, not the kinds with cannabis) love this feature as you can transport food in the slow cooker without it sloshing over.  But for cannabis cooks its beauty is in the fact that you will hardly smell the odor of simmering marijuana when infusing butter or oil.  At least not until you open the lid.  I discovered this quite by accident, but it works.  The Stay and Go Slow Cooker is also a quality product to use when making non-cannabis infused meals.  Check it out!
Using oils under the tongue (holding it there for a minute to let them sink in) will provide the quickest effects, but most will still only kick in from 1-2 hours from the time you take it – and can last for as long as 6-10 hours in some cases. The initial onset and duration of cannabis oil is much longer than vaping or smoking because it’s absorbed through the digestive system and bloodstream, and it’s not recommended to take a second dose (whether edible or sublingual) until 4 solid hours have gone by.
Extracts, or concentrates, are exactly what they sound like—products with high levels of THC that are made from cannabis by a number of methods, from sifting buds to isolate cannabinoid-rich trichomes,to supercritical CO2 extraction, which uses carbon dioxide at very high pressures to pull cannabinoids from the plant. (This professional technique is a popular way to decaffeinate coffee.) There is a dizzying array of extracts available, as well as ways to consume them, from vaporizing to smoking them atop traditional bud. And some have found their way into the kitchen.
The Dope Cup was held on a Sunday. Laurie & MaryJane had entered its brownies and almond bites in the competition. The Wolfs arrived at 10 p.m., three hours after the event started, because, as Laurie told me, “everybody’s late in this business.” The atmosphere was part county fair, part tent revival. A rap group, the Pharcyde, performed on a stage, and reps from marijuana businesses had set up booths. Wolf mingled with the crowd, which was mostly young and male. There were the seven scruffy dudes from 7 Points Oregon, the boutique growers whose product she’d used at her dinner party, and there was a purchasing agent from a dispensary called Canna-Daddy’s, who was holding a twenty-three-inch blunt. He wrapped Wolf in a bear hug. “Laurie’s the nicest lady I’ve ever met,” he told me.
Ratios and amounts are a personal thing. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce per cup of butter, for myself i usually use double that amount. Take my free dosing class to learn more at http://www.Cannademy.com. I am not a fan of the Magical Butter Machine and do not recommend it as I do not recommend finely grinding your plant material and machine forces you to do that.
The day after the dinner party, Wolf picked me up in her car, a Kia Soul in a shade called kale green. “The perfect Portland color,” she said. Despite her affinity with the city, she still thinks of herself as a New Yorker, and seems to enjoy shocking West Coast sensibilities. “People here are so earnest,” she said. “I once told a group of people someone’s baby looked like a tampon. They were, like, ‘I’ve never heard anyone say that out loud.’ ”

Take the sugar, syrup, and water and mix them together in a pot. Set it on the stove over a medium heat and stir them together until they ingredients dissolve. The mixture should begin to boil after a bit. Make sure that all of your ingredients have been mixed well! After the mixture begins to boil, slowly add the color and flavoring to the pot. Your mixture should be heated to about 300 degrees. This part is a little tricky because you have add the tincture very quickly. Speed is necessary at this part in the process because the liquid solidifies as soon as it begins to cool. Once you’ve quickly stirred in the tincture, pour the liquid in to your molds and let them set.
One of the newest ways people are enjoying cannabis is by combining it with cocktails and mocktails. This is especially popular at dinner parties in the any states where cannabis has recently become legal for recreation. But, with a strong taste and a particular method of infusion necessary, beginners may not know how best to make cannabis cocktails. This book has a collection of 75 cannabis drink recipes by “The Cocktail Whisperer” Warren Bobrow. It also includes a full history of cannabis as a social and medicinal drug. You will find recipes not only for cocktails but for shrubs, bitters, butters, oils and even coffee, tea and milk-based drinks for the morning hours. This is a really fun book for anyone who loves drinks and cannabis.
“I tell people that they need to soak the cannabis in distilled water for at least 24 to 48 hours just to take out the impurities and to remove the chlorophyll,” Jeff says. “And I teach people how to blanch it to take out even more of the taste and more of the impurities, so you’re working with a really fine product that you’re going to infuse into your butter or oil.”
In 2007, Child folded. The Wolfs decided to move to Oregon, seeking a change of pace. Laurie busied herself with a cookbook, “Portland, Oregon Chef’s Table,” for which she gathered recipes from local chefs. One day, when she was getting her car repaired, she struck up a conversation with a man in the service-station waiting room. “He stuck out his hand and said, ‘I’m Dr. Phil. Not that Dr. Phil. I’m a pot doctor.’ ” Medical marijuana had been legal in Oregon since 1998, and the doctor, Phil Leveque, was one of the state’s first practitioners. Wolf told him about her epilepsy and problems with Tegretol. “He told me, ‘Get off that stuff. It’s poison.’ ” Leveque wrote her a prescription for medical cannabis and instructed her to consume a small amount each morning. She found that it not only controlled her seizures but also stopped the “auras”—feelings of dizziness she’d continued to have on the anti-convulsant. She stopped taking Tegretol, and she hasn’t had a seizure since. “I don’t know if I can say I’m cured, but my symptoms are completely managed,” Wolf said.
Not only are hemp hearts an extremely nutritious part of a diet but they are also gluten free and are considered a raw food, plus they never contain allergens. The hearts aren’t nuts either, leaving them to be enjoyed by basically everyone. They can be eaten raw like peanuts or added to snacks like cereal, yogurt, or fruit salad. Taste-wise, they resemble sunflower seeds so if you enjoy those, you’ll definitely love the taste of hemp hearts. And if you don’t, simply juice them and drink them as a shot. It may taste bad but the health benefits are worth you taking a shot of something that doesn’t taste very good!
If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!
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