I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.


Slowly pour the tincture through the cheesecloth in to the jar. Be careful and do this slowly! If you rush, you run the risk of overfilling the cheesecloth and having a serious mess on your hands… And all over the rest of your kitchen too! Pour slowly. If the cloth gets too full of powder, change it. Once you’ve strained all of the mixture, squeeze the cheesecloth. A lot of glycerin gets stuck in there and if you don’t squeeze it, you’ll lose a lot of the product.
The daughter of legendary singer and songwriter, Bob Marley, penned this compilation of recipes that fits right in with Marley Natural’s clean, green, holistic lifestyle brand. It gives readers the chance to try their hands at making some of her family’s favorite (mostly vegetarian) Jamaican recipes. Intimate stories of her life growing up on the island, insight into how she includes cannabis in her personal wellness routine, and directions for infused beauty treatments accompany this robust collection of recipes.

SInce I have no t lab tested after using the Ardent Lyft, I can’t say for sure how well it works, but mine seems to work fine. It does take longer than what I typically do in the oven, but it seems to work. I have no idea what the tcheck device is, but I do know that home testing is wildly inaccurate (so much so as to be useless), so don’t know as you should much stock in the 0% cause that does not seem right. I use trim all the time, it’s great economical cooking material. Using trim should not be an issue at all. The slow cooker, with water added, is my personal favorite way of infusing oil or butter. Hope this helps.

If you’ve experimented with other forms of cannabis before, your sensitivity to THC is a key factor in what kind of oil to choose. If you enjoy the typical “high”, picking a THC-rich oil would kick that up a notch, whereas oils with higher concentrations of CBD often have reduced THC values and therefore feel more toned down. It’s recommended that most people start with a CBD-rich oil or an evenly balanced CBD-THC oil, observe, and then gradually increase the amount of THC. 

Cannaoil in your smoothie? Yes! Due to its reputation as a superfood and the creamy texture that results from blending coconut oil, it has become a popular addition to smoothies. There are a lot of recipes out there but you can experiment by adding a tablespoon of cannabis coconut oil or less if your infusion is strong (5-10 mg is a good starting point) to your favorite smoothie recipe.
Taffy is one of the best candies that one could hope to have, especially in the summer. For some reason, it just reminds me of the beach and of barbecues and genuine good times. So I figured that with the approaching summer months, making some taffy might be a good idea! And, as always, you know that anything made in my kitchen absolutely has to be medicated! This recipe is super easy and simple so pretty much anyone can get it done!
Set up a double boiler (take a large mason jar and a large saucepan and fill the pan about half way with water). Take your coconut oil and chips and add them to the mason jar, letting the chips slowly melt. It’s important to do this slowly so that you won’t lose any THC from the oil or butter that you’re using. Once the chips are melted, add in your Karo syrup. Be sure that everything is mixed (once the chips have melted fully, you can move the mixture to a bowl but you have to be quick because the liquid solidifies quickly once the heat source is removed) and then pour the mixture in to a saran-wrap lined 8×8 pan. Be sure that the saran-wrap covers the sides of the pan that you’re using so that the candy doesn’t stick. The wrap should overhang far enough that you can now wrap the top of the saran-wrap over the candy, fully covering it. Let the candy sit out overnight.
Did you cook the butter with water? If so sometimes you will have residual water left after straining. I strain and then heat gently to remove any residual water as it can cause mold if left for long periods, then do a secondary straining to get rid of any other sediment. If you did not add water to the mix, I am not sure where it would be coming from.
"This book is not a hodge-podge of information, it is carefully constructed to bring simplicity into your life, should you choose to medicate yourself using edibles....this book makes it sensible to experiment with the luscious sounding recipes that would be right at home-even in a non-cannabis kitchen."―Warren Bobrow, mixologist, chef, and author of Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations. www.cocktailwhisperer.com
Help! I am looking for a way to use BHO in cooking. I don’t know the ratios. I have made cannabutter many times and made BHO, but I’ve never cooked with it. One ounce of bud to pound of butter and the edibles are good and strong. I have one gram of BHO from the same bud and would love to cook with it. I know it will be so much stronger so I am not sure how to use in a recipe. Your help is appreciated! –Chiefing Chef
“If you’re stoned, it’s highly entertaining,” says cannabis chocolatier and co-host Vanessa Lavorato. The summer before Bong Appétit started filming, Lavorato says she slowly built up her tolerance to edibles, so she could better handle herself while stoned on air. In the end, all her hard work didn’t matter much. “You can’t hide it. You’re just really high on camera, which hopefully is funny for people.”
Let's just say you took your weed and put it into a crock pot, like a lot of people do, with some butter, oil, and water and let it simmer. What you're really doing, in addition to simmering all of those cannabinoids into the butter and oil, is also adding in any impurities that are in that bud. So anything that tastes really bad could be something as horrible as insecticides, or it could just be the chlorophyl, which also has a specific taste that's pretty powerful.
Turn your love of cooking and cannabis into an art form and learn how to make delicious cannabis-infused meals! Located at a fully-equipped cooking school, professional chef Patrick Bailey will guide you in the sophisticated art of cooking with cannabis. Learn everything you need to know about cooking with cannabis during this 2.5 hour, hands-on cannabis cooking class.
Because commercial cannabis production is still relatively new – many doctors haven’t figured out how to properly suggest doses for cannabis oil versus dried cannabis. To help them (and as part of the licensing process for producers), Health Canada has created the Equivalency Factor, which applies cannabis to a more familiar context of dosage of medicine.
As always, you first preheat the oven. This recipe calls for the oven to be set to 375 degrees. Grab a mixing bowl and mix in your sugars and the cannabutter, mixing them together well. Add in your eggs, pudding mix, and vanilla. Stir everything together until the mixture is creamy. Mix together the flour and baking soda and gradually add in to the mixing bowl. Stir everything together well (use a mixer if it makes you more comfortable). Then, proceed to stir in the chocolate chips. Measuring them out by the teaspoonful, place the cookies on to an ungreased baking sheet (Or you can grease it with some cannabutter to give the cookies an even stronger effect). Bake the cookies in the preheated oven for about 11 minutes or until they are lightly browned. Allow the cookies to cool before serving and enjoy your new twist on an old favorite!
Once your wings have been chilling in the fridge and you’re ready to bake them preheat your oven to *425 degrees. Lightly grease a cookie sheet with olive oil or cooking spray and set aside.  Melt a ½ cup of cannabis butter on low heat. Once your cannabis butter is melted turn heat off and whisk in ½ cup of hot sauce. Separate your hot sauce and cannabis butter mixture equally into 2 separate small bowls and set aside.

4. Place 2 toasted muffin halves on each of 2 plates. Top each muffin half with a slice of Canadian bacon. Use a slotted spoon to carefully remove each egg from the pan, letting any excess water drip off before placing 1 poached egg on top of each muffin half. Spoon the hollandaise sauce over the 4 muffin halves. Garnish each egg with the parsley. Serve immediately.
Laurie & MaryJane’s brownies went on sale in February. They come in packages of five, which sell for twenty to thirty-three dollars, depending on potency. Wolf currently has them in thirty-five dispensaries and has developed new products: an almond-cake bite, a chocolate truffle, and a soon-to-be-launched savory cheese crisp. Ultimately, she hopes to conquer Oregon—and then to try for California. “The dream is to be everywhere it’s legal,” Wolf said, sounding a bit Big Weed herself. “To be the Mrs. Fields of cannabis foods.”

There is no easier way to ingest too much marijuana than by eating it. Sometimes people are impatient and think “it’s not working” and eat more. By the time it all kicks in they have overdone it. While “overdoses” are not dangerous in that they are never fatal, they won’t shut down your organs, they can make you feel anxious, paranoid, and/or disoriented. Dosing edibles is somewhat of an art, a lot of factors need to be taken into consideration and people’s tolerances run a wide range. An amount that one person does not even physically feel might be enough to make someone else experience couch-lock for hours. When cooking with marijuana, especially new plant material you are not familiar with, it’s a good idea to vape or smoke a little to get general idea of its potency.  Keep in mind that cooking can intensify potency somewhat. If you do find a batch of your edibles is more potent than you intended the remedy is easy – eat less! Learn more about dosing when cooking with marijuana at this link.

It’s clear that if you cook your weed, you get a longer, stronger, and more legal experience than smoking marijuana but there are a few cons. The most obvious is that you don’t get as acutely high from pot edibles as you do from smoking marijuana. The second con is that dosing is much easier smoking weed than it is with edibles. Overdosing on edibles can produce a frightening experience but is usually not physically dangerous. The third con is simply that it takes about an hour to feel effects of edibles.


 Take 2 muffin tins and place the paper liners in each open holder, this is what you’ll be using to form the cups. Next pour chocolate chips into a microwave safe bowl and microwave them for about 2 minutes, after 1 minute stop and stir the chocolate and then let it continue to cook for the remaining minute. Once the chips are finished in the microwave, immediately add your finely ground Mary Jane and stir it into the chocolate making sure to mix them together very well.
Published in 2015 by a Colorado writer and photographer, this cookbook collects recipes from a dozen chefs and one bartender who specialize in cannabis-infused food. Before the recipes, there’s a 100-plus-page section that provides biographies of the chefs and discusses many aspects of buying, identifying and cooking with cannabis, covering cooking cultivars, details on infusions and extractions, plus dosing tips. There’s a longer section on how to make the oils and butters and tinctures than in many books; it also includes recipes for infused milk, cream, honey and simple syrup, all of which makes the recipes that follow succinct. The dosage per serving is clearly stated, and the recipe headnotes often include nicely geeky bits, such as how mangoes are reputed to heighten the effects of cannabis because they’re high (ha-ha) in myrcene molecules. Thus a recipe for rice pudding with green cardamom, mango and pistachios.
Next came the Dope Cup judges: Max Montrose, Jeff Greenswag, and Jim Nathanson. They work for a Colorado-based outfit called the Trichome Institute, named for the tiny crystal-like hairs that cover marijuana buds and leaves. Wolf ushered them into the living room, where smoking materials had been arrayed on the coffee table, including five cannisters with strains of marijuana from a local grower called 7 Points Oregon. “We have a Volcano”—a type of vaporizer—“set up and a couple of other things,” she said.
If you’re using a slow cooker, you’ll want to cook on low heat for at least 6 to 8 hours, but as long as 2 or 3 days if you want it really well infused and potent. If you’re using a saucepan, you’ll want to heat it for about half that time, but at least 3 hours. The longer you cook, the more the weed will infuse the oil. If you’re using the slow cooker, you don’t have to check it or mix as often. If using a saucepan, you’ll want to keep a close eye on it and mix frequently. You definitely don’t want it to boil over.
A communal dessert table of assorted cookies along with homemade chocolate, strawberry, soy and almond milk, and ice creams, mousses and sauces for for dipping. The cookies and sauces are both infused with CBD, a cannabinoid that many believe reduces the effects of THC, which Sayegh say he uses to help “balance people out at the end of the night”. Photo by Henry Drayton courtesy of The Herbal Chef.
"This book is not a hodge-podge of information, it is carefully constructed to bring simplicity into your life, should you choose to medicate yourself using edibles....this book makes it sensible to experiment with the luscious sounding recipes that would be right at home-even in a non-cannabis kitchen."―Warren Bobrow, mixologist, chef, and author of Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations. www.cocktailwhisperer.com
The following day, the candy should have hardened in to a taffy like substance, not too hard but not too soft. If the mixture hasn’t gained the correct consistency, continue to let it sit out until it does. Once the mix has the taffy consistency that we all love, you can cut it in to pieces and wrap them individually in wax or cellophane. Give them out as treats or hoard them all for yourself! Either way, enjoy your awesome taffy candy!
Because oils are slow-acting and long-lasting, it’s recommended that you start low, and go slow when experimenting with oils. They’re a much more concentrated version of flowers and buds and can have some unpleasant side effects like nausea, dizziness, thirst, and a drop in blood sugar levels if you go too quickly. Taking the oil with food in your stomach has been known to minimize nausea.
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With an easy and more precise dosage method, medical cannabis oils are ideal for oral consumption. However, they can be just as effortlessly added to what you’re eating. Because our extraction process includes decarboxylation, there is no need to decarb the oil on your own before cooking like you have to with dried flower. This means you can just add the oil to basically anything without any fuss or extra time. To add your oil into a food, simply measure your dosage as you normally would do with the syringe and add that specific amount to your recipe. If you’re cooking for one, you only need one dose. If you’re making a large batch, multiple your single dose by how many servings you are creating. (For example, if you’re making a dozen brownies you’ll want to add twelve times your single-use dose.) Ensure you mix thoroughly to distribute your medical cannabis evenly throughout your recipe.


Thank you for pointing that out. I will go in and rewrite to avoid confusion. You DEFINITELY want to decarb if the hash will not be cooked. If you are using hash in a cooked dish, the process of cooking can decarb it, HOWEVER, for maximum potency I recommend decarbing first in either instance. A medical marijuana provider friend of mine in WA state did an experiment by making 2 pans of brownies. In one he used kief that had not been decarbed, in the other kief that had been decarbed. Even though the process of baking the brownies will debarb some of the THC, he found the pan of brownies made with the kief that had been decarbed, lab tested about 30% higher than the other. SO my motto is decarb first in either instance.

Mary only recently told her family in Oklahoma about the new turn in her career. “I was so nervous,” she said. “I felt like I was coming out to them.” She was surprised to learn that they were curious about the medical uses of cannabis. One relative, who has chronic pain, started taking a Laurie & MaryJane brownie instead of painkillers to help him sleep. (He got his doctor’s approval.) Another uses their infused coconut oil to treat his aging dog’s epilepsy. (He mixes it with dog food.)
Pros: Edibles have demonstrated the longest-duration medicinal effect of any method of medication. Also, the total amounts of cannabinoids available through eating are multiplied and could have a much stronger effect than smoking. Coconut oil can be mixed with any foods to keep medication very discrete. Butter can also be used but use unsalted as it will separate. There are hundreds of recipes to meet dietary needs and taste pallets.
If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!
You sound biter about the taste of weed. If done without any care, yeah it taste like shit but weed can add some awesome flavor if done correctly. I made a lemon meringue pie with cannabis once and the flower really made it something special. No ass taste, just good lemon flavor complemented by the weed. too much weed and it starts to taste funny like you said but just the right amount is great. Too much of a good thing is never good.
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