Wow! Thank you for answering so fast Cheri! Appreciate it! You mentioned distributing the thick FECO into a medium to distribute it more evenly. Instead of a sauce pan should I use a pyrex measuring cup above a small pot of boiling water ( a makeshift double boiler) so the oil never gets above boiling temp 212 , so there wont be any chance of destroying potency?
The quality of butane gas used to make BHO is an additional health consideration. Among the Colorado marijuana business regulations, R605 says extraction companies must use solvents that are either food-grade or at least 99 percent pure; the purety of the butane is important because other less-expensive grades can contain contaminants not meant for human consumption.
"The way Julia Child brought French cuisine to the uncultured American masses in her debut cookbook 'Mastering the Art of French Cooking' is what Elise McDonough and the editors at High Times Magazine have done with 'The Official High Times Cannabis Cookbook'. Informative and accessible, it's an essential staple for any 'budding' chef. Starting with a wide range of basics that bind THC to fat molecules (cannabis-infused butters, oils and tinctures plus bonus mayonnaise and flour recipes), the book ventures offers easy-to-prepare recipes that will have even the sober drooling (the photographs help). Highlights include 'Cheeto Fried Chicken' from Fresh Off the Boat author and chef Eddie Huang, a Thai-style Tom Yum 'Ganja' soup, a Thanksgiving turkey with a marijuana-infused marinade, and even latkes."
You can combine the amount of tablespoons of infused-coconut oil you wish to consume based on the above formula with plain coconut oil to fill out any recipe that calls for oil. Brownies are easy because they usually call for 1/3 cup oil and may be divided and stored for later consumption. The above recipe of 1/3 cup infused-oil into 12 brownies would yield about 83mg cannabinoids per brownie.

We pulled up to Wolf’s “office,” a commercial kitchen called the Bitchin’ Kitchen, which was home to seventeen edible-marijuana startups. It has industrial-sized ovens, steel countertops, and a walk-in refrigerator with a vault door. Wolf opened a freezer to show me seventeen pounds of marijuana-infused butter. She and Mary made a fresh batch every week.

For some reason the majority of internet sites tell people to finely grind the marijuana being used to infuse marijuana butter or cannabis oil. There is even a commercially made electronic gadget for making marijuana butter that includes a built in electric grinder. I have never understood this advice. If you want better tasting edibles, DO NOT FINELY GRIND THE MARIJUANA! What you are trying the extract, the plant’s resinous trichomes, are ON the buds and leaves not IN them! All grinding accomplishes is to put more plant material into the finished product which in turn increases green color and unwanted herbal flavors.
Remove from oven and allow to cool fully before removing the foil. Depending on the material you use, it may be fine enough and require no further processing. If not, you can place the material in a food processor or blender, pulsing the cannabis until it is coarsely ground. Be careful not to over grind the material, as you do not want a super fine powder.
Also, when you're cooking in a pan to, say, sauté something, you have to be very careful. Obviously people use butter and oil to sauté all the time, but if you're thinking of using canna-butter or oil, just be aware that you can't use it in the same way you'd use anything else. When you're doing a dish that requires [cooking on a stovetop], what you have to do is put [the canna-butter or canna-oil] in at the end. Basically, you shut the heat off and you mix the butter or oil around to coat everything while the pan is still hot. That way, you won't lose any of the potency.

“My parents were a great introduction to the rest of the world, basically,” says Sayegh, who hopes that finely prepared food combined with the capacity to discuss the molecular structure of cannabis will help strip away the stigma of a plant still federally classified alongside heroin as a Schedule I drug. Far from a scourge, Sayegh and others see immense medical and economic potential in the herb.
 In a bowl, combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon, and oatmeal, mix well. Grab another bowl and beat eggs, salt, and vanilla. In another large bowl add the canna-butter, oil, and both sugars. Add in the egg mix until creamy and smooth. Then pour in the flour mix and stir everything in together. Now add in the raisins and mix once more.
“Edibles” is a just-published, user-friendly cookbook in a few notable ways: There is a lengthy and well-defined introductory section that discusses dosage, potency, effects, terminology and techniques. The 30 recipes that follow are purposefully low-dose (5 milligrams per serving), which is very helpful for beginning cooks, as well as those with a potentially problematic sweet tooth (Stephanie Hua is a confectioner at a marshmallow company; she and Coreen Carroll met at culinary school in San Francisco). The recipes are also a lot more appealing than those in many cannabis cookbooks, which can tend to run a little toward dorm food. Hua and Carroll instead give well-written recipes for cardamom caramels, gruyère and green garlic gougères, strawberry jam Pavlovas and roasted grape crostini. The blueberry lemon French macarons are a serious improvement on pot brownies.
In the early days, Wolf tried selling baklava at Oregon dispensaries, which baffled the medical-stoner crowd. “We were catering to the lowest element of pot smokers,” Wolf said. Since then, the audience has changed: sophisticated consumers are known today as “cannasseurs.” They appreciate savory foods, not only because savories avoid cliché—“everybody infuses desserts,” Wolf said—but also because many medical-marijuana users are diabetic, or avoiding sugar for other reasons. Wolf recommends having a bottle of infused salad dressing or pesto on hand. “Infusing a pesto is so easy,” she said. “You can make a bunch and toss it with noodles, and you’ve got a delicious meal.”
Melissa Parks, a classically trained chef who once worked in research and development for General Mills, is now the executive chef of Las Vegas-based edibles company Vert. She once orchestrated a dinner where she paired tokes of cannabis with dishes that complemented their terpenes. She married a particularly earthy strain called Bio-Diesel (“It had smells of when you drive into a forest over dirt with pine needles”) with a cocoa- and coffee-crusted pork tenderloin in sour cherry beurre blanc.
Cannabis Oil – Slow Cooker  Method (best choice): Add oil, marijuana plant material, and water to the slow cooker and cook on low for 4 to 8 hours.  I know some cooks who cook their oil for as much as 2 or 3 days in the slow cooker.  Feel free to do so if you choose.  It seems like overkill to me and after having tested longer cooking times, I found no improvement in quality or potency.  In fact, I noticed a stronger herbal flavor and not much else.  You can actually cook for less time, just make sure your mixture has time to come to a full simmer.
The quality of butane gas used to make BHO is an additional health consideration. Among the Colorado marijuana business regulations, R605 says extraction companies must use solvents that are either food-grade or at least 99 percent pure; the purety of the butane is important because other less-expensive grades can contain contaminants not meant for human consumption.
Amy Scattergood is a staff writer for the Food section of the Los Angeles Times. She has degrees from Yale Divinity School, the Iowa Writers Workshop and the Cordon Bleu and has written a book of poetry and co-written a whole grain cookbook. Although originally from Iowa, she’s lived in L.A. for a long time now and will continue to do so, as long as tacos and the Pacific Ocean exist.
This is a slightly healthier snack that stoners can enjoy… And get stoned while eating it as well! Toasted bananas aren’t nearly as bad for you as pizza so if you’re looking to stay a bit healthier, this medible is highly recommended for you. Not only that but it’s a good snack for a cold winter’s night and will distract you from the awful snowstorms some of us are about to deal with! And if you’re not going to freeze this winter, you can enjoy these snacks while laying by the pool.

A standard dose of a CBD-rich oil begins at 10 mg – or 1ml (depending on the equivalency). However, it’s also possible to microdose at 2.5 to 5 milligrams daily. For more severe conditions, a much higher dose may be needed – and some patients are known to go up to 1 gram per day. However, a daily gram of cannabis oil is a very large amount and the attention of a cannabis-savvy doctor is always best. 
 Fill the cupcake tins with the batter about 2/3 of the way full to leave room for your THC treats to fluff up and be pretty. Put them inside the oven and let them hang out in there for about 17-20 minutes or until completely cooked in the middle. (Poke a toothpick in the middle of the cupcakes to check, if the pick comes out clean with no batter then they’re done) When they’re finished in the oven let them sit for 5-10 minutes to cool. Now it’s time to hand out these yummy marijuana chocolate cupcakes and get couch locked. You says you can’t have you cake and get high too?
All cannabis oil packaging must also state the percentage of THC and CBD in the oil (so you know how potent and psychotropic it is before you use it). Just like strains of dried cannabis, oils can have stronger concentrations of CBD, THC, or be more balanced, and thus create very different experiences. Not all oils are created equal – so reading the packaging is crucial for your first time. 
Weed connoisseur Pilcher (Spliffs 3: The Last Word on Cannabis Culture) deals a gnarly collection of 35 starters, entrees, desserts and drinks, all using the kind of pot not generally found in the kitchen cabinet. Nor is this the type of cookbook that provides a list of suppliers for hard-to-find ingredients. But for the reader with a ready stash, these offerings are served up in a well-researched and easy to digest manner, with plenty of tempting color photos and helpful data such as the suggested amount of cannabis bud per person per meal, based on body weight. The key to being a successful ganja gourmet, it turns out, is to first prepare a smooth batch of either Cannabis Ghee or Cannabis Butter. This allows for easier measurement but more importantly ensures that the psychoactive chemical du jour, tetrahydrocannabinol, blends evenly into the dish. Thus three tablespoons of Cannabutter transform perfectly legal mushrooms into Really Wild Mushroom Sauté and the hopped-up ghee is at the heart of an in-your-face Charas Curry, where it mingles with red chilies, ginger and cilantro. There's a classic brownie recipe, of course, sweetened with honey. (Oct.)
For years, I prepared my homemade cannabis edibles with the same process, blind to the small mistakes I was making along the way. Yes, I achieved a product that would do the job (sometimes too well), but I had no idea that I could improve the flavor and consistency all while conserving time, money, and product by tweaking just a few steps along the way. All it took was putting the cooking utensils down for a few hours and listening to a pro.
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