Thank you for pointing that out. I will go in and rewrite to avoid confusion. You DEFINITELY want to decarb if the hash will not be cooked. If you are using hash in a cooked dish, the process of cooking can decarb it, HOWEVER, for maximum potency I recommend decarbing first in either instance. A medical marijuana provider friend of mine in WA state did an experiment by making 2 pans of brownies. In one he used kief that had not been decarbed, in the other kief that had been decarbed. Even though the process of baking the brownies will debarb some of the THC, he found the pan of brownies made with the kief that had been decarbed, lab tested about 30% higher than the other. SO my motto is decarb first in either instance.
“If you’re stoned, it’s highly entertaining,” says cannabis chocolatier and co-host Vanessa Lavorato. The summer before Bong Appétit started filming, Lavorato says she slowly built up her tolerance to edibles, so she could better handle herself while stoned on air. In the end, all her hard work didn’t matter much. “You can’t hide it. You’re just really high on camera, which hopefully is funny for people.”
"Written by a ten-year veteran of the iconic magazine, Elise McDonough, the cookbook is humorous yet educational and compassionate yet still strongly counter-culture, as befitting the magazine's 40-year legacy. For those people who require medibles in their own lives or make them as part of underground compassionate care groups...the book is a highly useful tool." -Houston Press

Here’s what I would do to try to salvage it. Filter the sludge out as much as possible, use a cheesecloth-lined strainer or even better a fine mesh bag like used for making nut milks. Then put the remaining butter and water in a container and put it in the fridge or even freezer. The butter should separate and harden on top. Hopefully, you will still have something you can use. It’s probably not going to taste very good, but you should be able to salvage something.
How to Make Infused Coconut Oil Making cannabis-infused coconut oil is as simple as steeping quality herb in a quality oil. Machines are available to make cannabis-infused coconut oil, but the infusion process can be done right on a stovetop or hot plate with the help of a double boiler. What You Will Need Double boiler (you can make one if you don’t own one) ¼ to ½ ounce of cannabis 1 cup of coconut oil (organic, expeller-pressed works best for this process) 2-3 feet of cooking twine (a clean unused white shoestring will work in a pinch) Cheesecloth (about an 8” x 10” piece) TIP: A ratio of one quarter ounce of cannabis to one cup of oil is a good starting point. If you want a potent oil, high-quality flower (15%+ THC) works well. However, until you become more comfortable with the process or if you have limited funds, using shake, trim and/or kief work fine (avoid stems and seeds). Cooking Directions Prepare the “herb packet”: Lay the cheese cloth out flat Place the cannabis (breaking up larger pieces) into the middle and distribute evenly over a small area (remember the packet needs to fit into the top pan) Fold in opposite ends to cover the herb Now fold in one of the open ends, tuck and roll Tie the roll of herb tightly with cooking twine (tying a knot in one end and then guiding the twine through it works good) Fill the bottom pan of a double boiler with a few inches of water (allowing enough space so that it does not touch the top pan) and set the shallow pan on top. Place over medium heat to a gentle boil - NOT a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of coconut oil to the top pan. When the coconut oil is almost melted, add about 1 cup of water so that the liquid will cover the herb packet [Note: Coconut oil is nonpolar and water is polar so they will naturally separate when chilled; and THC and CBD are not soluble in water, but are in certain carrier oils. Therefore, the coconut oil acts as the carrier and will “soak” up the cannabinoids, leaving any impurities in the water.] Continue heating the oil and water mixture until all of the coconut oil is melted and then add the herb packet - pressing down gently into the liquid using a metal spoon. Cover and leave to cook for 90 minutes, checking back every half hour or so to flip over the packet and stir it around gently. Also, check the water in the bottom pan to make sure it is not boiling too hard and that the water level is still good - be careful to avoid any escaping steam when removing the top pan. After 90 minutes, the oil and water mixture should be a deep green color. At this point, turn off the heat and remove the herb packet and place in a bowl. Squeeze out any oil that is trapped in the “herb packet” by pressing with a spoon (when it cools down, you can give it another squeeze by hand to get every drop). Add this to the liquid mixture and place in the refrigerator to cool. When the mixture is cooled, the water and oil separate (dirty looking water on the bottom and a nice green color solidified oil containing the good stuff on top). Gently poke 2 or 3 holes through the oil, turn over (holding your hand gently over the oil) and drain the water off. If you are not going to use the oil immediately, store in a container (glass preferred) and label with date, strain and ratio. This will help you determine which strains and in what quantities work best for you. The most important thing to remember is that the effects of consuming cannabis-infused coconut oil (directly or as an ingredient in a cooked dish) are usually slow-acting due to the cannabinoids having to be digested first. As such, it may take up to three (3) hours for you to feel its maximum effects, and those effects could last for awhile. If you find yourself feeling overwhelmed or concerned about overdosing, don’t panic -- no one has ever died as a direct result of consuming cannabis. Choosing the Right Strain Your next choice will be determining what strain(s) of cannabis to use. The infusion process does not drastically change the effects or flavors of the variety of cannabis used. Therefore, you will want to use a cannabis strain that delivers the desired effects you want to achieve (indica, sativa, hybrid, high-CBD). Most importantly, you want to be sure that the cannabis you use is free from impurities (such as mold, fungus, bugs, and pesticides). If the cannabis is compromised, the infusion process will not correct it. Cooking Temperatures Cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids are all affected differently by heat. A double boiler traps steam between the pans (provided you have a good seal) and remains steady about 212° F. The most volatile terpenes will start to evaporate around 70° F (filling the air with a pungent aroma). A majority of the remaining terpenes will begin to evaporate rapidly around 100° F. The boiling points of flavonoids range between 273.2° and 352.4° F, so the dominant flavors of the strain you use should still be evident in the infused oil. Cannabinoids, specifically THC and CBD, exist in acidic and activated forms. In the plant, these cannabinoids exist almost entirely in the acidic form and are known as THCA and CBDA. When heated, these acidic forms undergo a chemical reaction called decarboxylation that results in THCA converting to THC and CBDA converting to CBD. Complete activation occurs when heated to 220° F for 90 minutes. In theory, the double boiler cooks at 212° F, but many factors can change that number, so you may need to experiment by adding or subtracting a few minutes to achieve your desired effects. Remember, if you are going to use the oil in a recipe that will expose it to further heat, you don’t want it to be fully activated at this stage. Further, coconut oil has an average smoking point of 350° F, and can be very tricky to cook on direct heat. A double boiler cooks by steam so the oil doesn’t burn easily. Overcooking the oil compromises the fats and the taste will be most unappealing. If this happens, all you can do is throw it out, wipe the pan clean, and start over. Health Benefits Cannabis and coconut oil are what some would call the perfect pair. Coupling coconut oil, “a vegan-friendly super food,” with cannabis, “nature’s miracle plant,” makes a lot of sense. Coconut oil is a saturated oil made primarily of medium-chain fatty acids. It is safe to ingest in edible form and is easily digested. It gets its extra punch from lauric acid (C12), which comprises about 50% of the total fatty acids, and has been linked to many health benefits: reducing abdominal obesity, accelerating healing time for wounds, delivering antioxidant properties, lowering lipid components (e.g. cholesterol, triglycerides), preventing bone loss and more. Some people even use coconut oil as a daily detox. Saturated fats have gotten a bad rap for decades. They have been accused of contributing to high cholesterol, heart disease, obesity, and even Alzheimer’s disease. Much confusion and contradictory evidence exists on the subject, even among health care professionals. Professionals, like Dr. Aseem Malhotra, are trying to set the record straight. Dr. Malhotra gained attention after the publication of his peer-reviewed editorial in the 2013 British Medical Journal (BMJ), wherein he seriously challenged the conventional view on saturated fats, and found no significant association between saturated fat and cardiovascular risk. Coconut Oil Uses There are so many things you can do with cannabis infused coconut oil including: Drizzle over hot cooked pastas, grains, cereals and vegetables Great for sauces and dressings Add to hot cooked soups and stews Use as a poultry rub Pan fry foods like scrambled egg, fish, bananas, chicken Put a spoonful in your coffee, tea or hot chocolate Add to smoothies Types of Coconut Oil Organic, virgin (or extra-virgin), raw, unrefined, centrifuged and cold-pressed are all terms you want to look for when selecting a coconut oil for ingesting with no cooking or for use in low-heat cooking. These oils typically deliver a strong coconut flavor. Organic, refined, expeller-pressed and solvent-free are the terms you are looking for when selecting an oil for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, especially when using higher temperatures. These refined oils also tend to have a lighter coconut flavor. Virgin Oil: Unrefined / Centrifuged Oil True virgin oil is a centrifuged coconut oil produced without using heat. It is considered one of the highest quality oils, but also one of the most expensive coconut oils on the market today. Terms like raw, pure and unrefined are associated with virgin oils. Virgin coconut oil has a more distinct coconut flavor. It is considered by most to be extremely mild and smooth, and can be eaten right off a spoon. Producing high-quality virgin oil is timely and expensive. Using a machine (centrifuge) cooled by chilled water, coconut cream is produced from pressing the fresh, white meat of the coconut and then concentrating it to yield more and more oil while the proteins and water soluble constituents are separated out and more of the phytonutrients are preserved. Unlike olive oil and some of the other oils, there are no standards to be met in the coconut oil industry to claim extra-virgin status. It is mostly a buzz word used for marketing. Cold-pressed Oils Cold-pressed coconut oils are also often referred to as raw or unrefined. The extraction method used to produce these oils is very similar to the centrifuged method used to make virgin coconut oils. The cold-pressing method however uses a drying process, which can be accomplished using varying degrees of heat. Therefore, very few cold-pressed oils are truly virgin oils. The method of drying and amount of heat used will determine the quality and taste of the coconut oil. Oils processed at high temperatures may taste of toasted coconut, while those processed at lower temperatures tend to deliver more of a mild, raw coconut flavor. If the oil was poorly processed, it may exhibit burnt or rancid qualities. Refined or RBD Coconut Oils Most coconut oils available on the market today are refined or RBD (refined, bleached and deodorized). If a label doesn’t say it is otherwise, then it is most likely refined. These are typically the least expensive of all coconut oils. Refined coconut oil should deliver a light, delicate flavor. The refining process strips away some of the nutrients, but it doesn’t have to alter other attributes of the coconut oil (such as fatty acid profile, taste, aroma). The methods for producing refined oils varies significantly, and can be accomplished with or without harsh solvents (like lye or hexane). If a product doesn’t say it is solvent free, it is a safe bet it was chemically processed and you should avoid it. Otherwise, RBD oils are fine to use, especially for cooking. Bleaching simply refers to the filtering process to remove impurities and is generally not a chemical process. Organic usually signifies that no harsh chemicals or solvents were used in the production. Expeller-pressed Extraction Method The expeller-pressed extraction method is used to produce RBD oils. During production the coconut meat is dried (most often by sun or smoke) and then pressed in large expeller presses. The resulting coconut oil is crude and must be refined or cleaned to minimize free fatty acids, remove remaining moisture, and minimize bad flavors or aromas. Expeller-pressed coconut oils can be a good option if you do not want to pay the premium for virgin oils. They are also a good option for those who do not like the taste of coconuts, or don’t want a strong coconut flavor for baking, sautéing and stir-frying, certain foods. Just be certain that no chemicals or solvents were used in the process. MCT Oil Medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) are a form of saturated fatty acid that has numerous health benefits. Coconut oil is one great source of MCTs. Roughly 65% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are medium-chain triglycerides. There are four kinds of MCTs: caproic (C6), caprylic (C8), capric (C10) and lauric (C12) acids. Generally speaking, the shorter the chain (meaning the lower the number of carbons the acid has), the faster the body can turn the fatty acids into ketones (usable energy). MCT oil is not an oil found in nature, but is instead manufactured by machine. The fatty acids are extracted through an industrial process of fractionation and concentrated into MCT oil. The logic is that since MCTs are healthy, the more the better. However, lauric acid (C12) is totally void, or present only in minuscule amounts in MCT oil. This has caused much debate on the matter. One side argues that MCT oils don’t include lauric acid because it is rare and more costly to include, and the other side argues that C12 is a less efficient way to obtain energy and adds nothing extra to the product. MCT oil makers advocate using only C8 and C10 (or 100% of one or the other) because they are the most rapidly metabolized for energy. Choosing between coconut oil and MCT oil, or deciding which one is better, should not be a concern when you understand the differences. On one hand, coconut oil is high in lauric acid which has well-documented health benefits, and MCT oil has very little to offer in that way. On the other hand, MCT oil may help raise energy levels better than coconut oil, but little proof is available to validate this claim. If you do plan to use an MCT oil, be sure the label clearly lists the ingredients and discloses how it was produced. Many MCT oils are chemically altered and contain unhealthy fillers like polyunsaturated fats, and due to their refining process may use harsh solvents and chemicals in manufacturing. Storage and Shelf-Life Be sure to keep the infused oil in a container with a tight lid (insects and critters love it). A glass jar with a wide mouth works well so that you can scoop it out easily. The infused oil should be kept out of direct sunlight. It can be refrigerated, but it is not necessary. It can also be frozen, but freezing it will change the taste - sometimes for the better but sometimes for the worse. Coconut oil is very stable and depending on the kind, can last anywhere from 18 months to several years. Opinions differ on how long cannabis-infused oil can be kept. Most agree that degradation begins after 2-3 months, and sooner after repeated exposure to air (opening and shutting the jar) or overexposure to sunlight or heat. This does not mean it is unusable, but you will definitely start to notice a change in the taste and effectiveness as the cannabinoids begin to degrade.
However, some people cook with cannabis at home and create their own cannabis oil by heating buds and flowers with a base oil like grapeseed or other cooking oils. Cannabinoids like THC and CBD are fat-soluble, hydrophobic oils, meaning they dissolve in oils, butters, fats and alcohol, but not water. To be effective, cannabis and its extracts or concentrates must be heated in order to convert the cannabinoid THCA into active THC.
Hi Cheri, I made what I thought was a double-infused oil with 4 oz of decarbed trim and 3c of coconut oil. I made it in two batches because the volume of trim was much higher than the oil. For the second batch of new trim I used the same infused 3c of oil. I thought I would have rocket launchers for my final product but I don’t. Is it true that oil has a saturation point? Perhaps I over infused and ended up sadly wasting a lot of my product? And, if I simply reheated the infused oil for another hour without the trim would it extract more? Thanks in advance for your response.
Published in 2015 by a Colorado writer and photographer, this cookbook collects recipes from a dozen chefs and one bartender who specialize in cannabis-infused food. Before the recipes, there’s a 100-plus-page section that provides biographies of the chefs and discusses many aspects of buying, identifying and cooking with cannabis, covering cooking cultivars, details on infusions and extractions, plus dosing tips. There’s a longer section on how to make the oils and butters and tinctures than in many books; it also includes recipes for infused milk, cream, honey and simple syrup, all of which makes the recipes that follow succinct. The dosage per serving is clearly stated, and the recipe headnotes often include nicely geeky bits, such as how mangoes are reputed to heighten the effects of cannabis because they’re high (ha-ha) in myrcene molecules. Thus a recipe for rice pudding with green cardamom, mango and pistachios.
In the early days, Wolf tried selling baklava at Oregon dispensaries, which baffled the medical-stoner crowd. “We were catering to the lowest element of pot smokers,” Wolf said. Since then, the audience has changed: sophisticated consumers are known today as “cannasseurs.” They appreciate savory foods, not only because savories avoid cliché—“everybody infuses desserts,” Wolf said—but also because many medical-marijuana users are diabetic, or avoiding sugar for other reasons. Wolf recommends having a bottle of infused salad dressing or pesto on hand. “Infusing a pesto is so easy,” she said. “You can make a bunch and toss it with noodles, and you’ve got a delicious meal.”
It seems like there’s a Marley family member in every branch of the weed industry, and food is no exception. Bob’s eldest daughter, Cedella, is the author of “Cooking with Herb,” a cookbook focused on how the health benefits of cannabis can benefit a holistic lifestyle, whether it’s eaten or consumed in some other way. True to the family’s Jamaican roots, the book is full of Caribbean recipes for dishes like saltfish, jerk chicken and spicy Jamaican patties. But it’s not just a cookbook; Cedella’s volume also features wellness tips and directions for making your own beauty products.
Pour the mixture through the fine strainer, in to a large bowl and discard any solids that are left behind in the strainer. Place this bowl in the fridge and leave it uncovered for an hour, stirring it occasionally. Then, place plastic wrap over the top of the mixture and let it chill for another 12 to 24 hours. After that amount of time has passed, pour the cold mixture in to a 1 1/2 quart ice cream freezer container. Stick it in the freezer for three hours and then stir in the vanilla wafers and the lime juice. Put the container back in the freezer for another six hours or until the mixture has become firm. Let the ice cream stand for five minutes before serving it. Enjoy!
Okay so this is the first time that I made tincture so this recipe isn’t perfect. I’m working on making it better but keep in mind that you can change the above recipe to see how you see fit. You can definitely add more marijuana and glycerin. Adjust the recipe to your liking. I got 11 fl oz of tincture from this recipe. Next time, I plan on using 32 fl oz glycerin with 28 grams of actual bud. This way, the tincture should be a little bit stronger.

Let's just say you took your weed and put it into a crock pot, like a lot of people do, with some butter, oil, and water and let it simmer. What you're really doing, in addition to simmering all of those cannabinoids into the butter and oil, is also adding in any impurities that are in that bud. So anything that tastes really bad could be something as horrible as insecticides, or it could just be the chlorophyl, which also has a specific taste that's pretty powerful.

She decided that she could do better. At home, she came up with a recipe for infused almond bars, using the powerful taste of the almond extract to mask the taste of marijuana. “They had the texture of a thick sugar cookie,” she told me. “Crisp on the outside but chewy on the inside, with sliced almonds on top.” They contained a hundred and forty-five milligrams of THC. She sold them to local dispensaries, where they were a hit. The only complaint: even the heavy users were getting too stoned. You were supposed to eat only a fraction of the bar. “People would say, ‘They’re too delicious. I couldn’t stop eating it!’ ” Wolf said.
Marijuana is oil-based, so knowing this is very important when it comes to cooking with cannabis. THC is the pyschoactive property in Marijuana and is contained in the capitate glands that cover its leaves, but the flowers / marijuana buds contain the most THC. When cooking or baking with marijuana, you should always use an oil-based product, such as butter or vegetable oil, as these do a great job at dissolving the capitate glands and releasing the THC. There are a few basic ways of using the cannabis plant for cooking: one is to make butter aka cannabutter and the other is to make flour. Another way is to make Marijuana Alcohol, which you can learn about in our marijuana beverages section. Either way you choose to make your marijuana induced foods requires the use of either the cannabis plant leaves and clippings or using the finished marijuana buds, which is my preference as it is by far the most potent way of making Weed Butter (Cannabutter). You can cook with cannaoil in any recipe that calls for oil.

Published in 2015 by a Colorado writer and photographer, this cookbook collects recipes from a dozen chefs and one bartender who specialize in cannabis-infused food. Before the recipes, there’s a 100-plus-page section that provides biographies of the chefs and discusses many aspects of buying, identifying and cooking with cannabis, covering cooking cultivars, details on infusions and extractions, plus dosing tips. There’s a longer section on how to make the oils and butters and tinctures than in many books; it also includes recipes for infused milk, cream, honey and simple syrup, all of which makes the recipes that follow succinct. The dosage per serving is clearly stated, and the recipe headnotes often include nicely geeky bits, such as how mangoes are reputed to heighten the effects of cannabis because they’re high (ha-ha) in myrcene molecules. Thus a recipe for rice pudding with green cardamom, mango and pistachios.
That evening’s festivities were business, of a kind. Dope, a “cannabis lifestyle” magazine, was hosting its annual Oregon Dope Cup in Portland. The event is one of many that aspire to be the Oscars of the legal-cannabis industry. Laurie & MaryJane had won a Best Edible trophy at the previous Dope Cup, in Seattle, for its savory nuts. Last year, the company agreed to host an edibles dinner for the magazine’s guests, including the cup’s judges, who had flown in from Colorado.
If using whole buds or trim, make sure that the material is ground up relatively fine. We prefer to use a traditional grinder as opposed to a food processor or blender, as they typically pulverize the starting material. If using hash that has greased up or congealed into a sticky ball, attempt to break up the hash into smaller pieces; the goal being to increase the exposed surface area.
Decarboxylated cannabis can (and has been) infused into a spectrum of household ingredients, from avocado oil to bacon fat, although some may be better conduits than others. In a trial where she infused and tested a number of vehicles, McDonough found that clarified butter and coconut oil produced especially potent solutions. Her hypothesis as to why? Saturated fats like butter and coconut oil are better able to absorb THC than monounsaturated fats like olive oil. “We’ll need to do more study,” she writes, “but in the meantime, all of you cannabis cooks at home can rest assured that using clarified butter or coconut oil for your cannabis infusions will result in a potent and cost-effective infusion.”
While historians have found recipes involving weed dating back to 15th century Europe and even 10th century India, pot brownies were introduced to pop (or should we say “pot”?) culture in the 1968 movie “I Love You Alice B. Toklas.” Objectively, the most common way to make weed-laced snacks is marijuana butter, but baking with cannabis oil can be even more effective. While these two products have many similar uses and come from the same plant, they’re produced and used in very different ways.

Pour the ounce of ground cannabis into the upper chamber and mix well with the wooden spoon. Allow the mixture to continue to simmer for 30-40 minutes, stirring regularly, until the liquefied butter turns emerald green. While the butter is infusing, wipe out the large mixing bowl that held the cannabis, stretch a piece of cheese cloth across the rim and secure it with a rubber band.
Take the sugar, syrup, and water and mix them together in a pot. Set it on the stove over a medium heat and stir them together until they ingredients dissolve. The mixture should begin to boil after a bit. Make sure that all of your ingredients have been mixed well! After the mixture begins to boil, slowly add the color and flavoring to the pot. Your mixture should be heated to about 300 degrees. This part is a little tricky because you have add the tincture very quickly. Speed is necessary at this part in the process because the liquid solidifies as soon as it begins to cool. Once you’ve quickly stirred in the tincture, pour the liquid in to your molds and let them set.
Basil traveled from Chicago to attend Feast and signed up for the Sugar High class because he’s “just fascinated by the whole phenomenon of edibles,” he said. He’s never cooked with cannabis before but figured if he came to Portland, a city known for pot, he might be able to pick up a few pointers. A carpenter by trade, Basil has dealt with carpel tunnel problems in both hands for the last few years. 

The Marijuana Cookbook is special because it is a collection of recipes submitted by the members of a facebook fanpage, and I am pretty sure it is the first book conceived and written by the fans of a facebook page. And if sharing your recipe is the reason that you’re here on the Book’s website, then I would like to thank you in advance for submitting your Marijuana Medible Recipe
Because marijuana in food takes longer to metabolize, it will take longer for it to affect you. Expect to feel the effects in about 30 minutes to an hour.[16] Expect the effects to last longer as well compared to smoking. You will not get the same effects due to the differences in how the body absorbs the cannabinoids. Be careful not to overdose by overeating when the effects are not as strong as desired.

Guacamole! Guacamole! Guacamole! This exciting party dip just gained a lot more celebrity and could be your new best friend. Guacamole is nothing short of fantastic, but with canna-oil it’s nothing short of magical. With so many flavors and textures, it knows how to pop around on your taste buds giving you all the right flavors. The rich green avacado color is a reminder of sweet Mary Jane, and when the buzz kicks in from eating it you’ll be glad you ate so much.


 After bananas are battered, place them in the very hot oil and let them sizzle and get yummy until they turn golden brown in color. Leave them to cool on a plate with 2 paper napkins to soak up any excess oil. Once cooled, add a little more pizazz and sprinkle them with sugar and cinnamon. Or if you’re in the mood to be really naughty, serve with ice cream and indulge yourself in a banana sweet stone.
High Times Magazine is well known and definitely well loved by marijuana aficionados all over the globe. They have been reporting on cannabis culture for decades, and have become the world leader in cannabis entertainment. They even have their famous Cannabis World Cup each year, which draws thousands of enthusiasts to sample different strains and celebrate cannabis in all of its different forms.
How to Make Cannabis Infused Rice Crispy Treats Even though we are all adults here, we all crave the comfort foods of our childhood from time to time. Honestly, who can resist the ooey-gooey goodness of melted marshmallow mixed with warm rice crispies — especially when they are infused with your favorite plant? Talk about an irresistible combination for nearly anyone but diabetics. Making a good batch of weed infused rice crispy treats comes down to using high-quality ingredients and following a few simple directions. Use this helpful step-by-step guide to get started with your first batch of canna-crispies: You …
Wolf is sometimes called the Martha Stewart of edibles. The designation owes something to superficial similarities. At sixty-two, Wolf resembles a crunchier version of the domestic icon: she has an ample figure, graying hair, and glasses, and she wears loose linen outfits, generally paired with Crocs. But the designation also refers to her role as an educator, schooling people on how best to cook with marijuana. She is the author or co-author of several cookbooks, including “Herb,” which seeks to “elevate the art and science of cooking with cannabis” and “The Medical Marijuana Dispensary,” which features soothing dishes, like stuffed sweet potato, that will get you stoned. Her recipes appear in all the major cannabis publications: High Times, Dope, and Culture, as well as the Cannabist, a Denver Post Web site devoted to the booming legal-marijuana industry. There you can watch her instructional videos on making infused delicacies like the creamy chicken-based Mama Leone’s soup. (“This soup is worth its weight in weed.”)

You also need to understand the quantity and how to deal with it when making edibles. For example, let's say you're doing a simple boxed brownie recipe that calls for a third of a cup of oil. A quick fix would be just replacing that with a third of a cup of canna-oil. However, if you do that and you don't understand the potency of that oil, you can't say how many milligrams of THC are in each brownie—you might actually overmedicate that brownie.

Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

Place peanut butter, canna butter and salt in a large microwaveable bowl and melt in microwave until completely melted, about 2 minutes if using reg peanut butter. If using natural, it will liquify faster. Stir in the vanilla and powdered sugar ( I use a mixer and whip it up for a couple minutes making it lighter). Spread the fudge into the prepared pan, smoothing the top with an offset spatula or spoon. Cover and place in the fridge until cool.
Decarbing…. it sounds like your oven is not going to cut it for that. The slow cooker, unfortunately, does not get hot enough to properly do the job. I even tried under pressure in my Instant Pot and it only worked so-so. I don’t imagine you have a sous vide machine, most people don’t, but if you did this would work. It is basically a boil in bag but very temperature controlled. The other solution is a bit pricey, but I do like the Ardent decarboxylator as it takes away all the guesswork and gives perfect results every time (enter the coupon code CANNACHERI and $30 bucks off, thanks to the reader who asked for a discount code cause the company gave me one http://bit.ly/cheri-ardent). You can read my review of this gadget at https://www.cannabischeri.com/lifestyle/reviews/cannabis-product-reviews-ardent-decarboxylator-nova/ .

Hello from England. Thanks for your article. I’m completely new to this, and found this very helpful. I’ve been given some solid hash but as I don’t smoke, eating is obviously the way forward. To avoid any smell in my house (we have teenage children) could i bake it in a sealed oven bag? If yes, would this affect times and temps? Thanks for your help.

For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.
While some purists will tell you this is hearsay, adding water to your infusing process is a nifty trick. This way, you can infuse at a lower temperature. The amount of water you add is not important, but try to use at least as much water as oil or butter. The water boils off. You can also see the difference in your “washed” end product. It is not as green.
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