Hi my question is different but j hope you can answer it. I have a slow cooker that I let someone borrow to make butter in. It has been washed. Is it ok to use to cook my regular family meals and potluck foods without worry of left over residue interfering. I would hate to bring something to a potluck or my young children and they have marijuana in it.
CBD and CBDa, among other cannabinoids have been demonstrated to be useful against many skin conditions and pain associated with arthritis, nerve pain, and cancer. To extract the cannabinoids in the High CBD Hash Oil use either edible methodology described above.  You can activate more CBDa to CBD by simmering the solution on the stove for the 30 minutes instead of being cautious not to create bubbles.
After the liquid forms the thin layer of ice, remove the bowl from the freezer. Don’t let the liquid swish around or you’ll disturb the settled trichomes. Using a turkey baster or something similar, slowly remove the liquid from the bowl. This is a time consuming process because you can’t disturb the settled matter at the bottom. Once the liquid gets down to a very low level, you can use paper towels to help absorb. After you’ve removed the liquid, take a hair dryer to the mixture, carefully drying it. The mixture should get lighter and be about the same color all the way around.
Combine in your glass jar, 3 ounces of drinking alcohol with your ounce of hash oil, or in a 3:1 ratio, according to the strength of your hash oil.  Seal the mixture and put it in the freezer for 6 or more days, shaking a few times per day.  Now store your tincture in your one ounce eye drop bottles.  Before taking, you should first calculate how much thc each dropper, and each drop holds, according to the strength of the hash oil and how much you’ve used.  This method has the most easy method of consumption.  Use the eye dropper to squirt a measured amount of weed tincture under the tongue, hold for half a minute, then swallow it down.  The thc and other cannabinoids will bring health benefits, but the psychoactive ingredients will have less effect because it may not have been activated by heat.  As with any oral consumption, effects come on slow and then goes stronger for longer.  It is important to make sure you know how much cannabinoids you are consuming, and not to re-dose before the effects take hold, which can take as much as one to two hours.
With such an awesome title, how can you not be intrigued as to how to make this amazing holiday treat? It’s medicated, delicious, and can make the perfect addition to a holiday party or as a present. These cookies are your normal medicated chocolate chip cookies but with a twist! Theres vanilla pudding added in as well, giving these cookies a different taste then what most people are used to. This will definitely give you the upper hand at winning who makes the best cannabis cookies!
It depends on the strength of the kief and the tolerance of the person consuming it. Everyone responds drastically differently to cannabis, especially edible cannabis. While 10 mgs THC (the maximum per serving dose allowed in commercial edibles in many states) will be too much for some people, 100 mgs will not be enough for others. If you look at recipes for kief they recommend anywhere from 1/16 of a gram up to a gram (although in most cases that will be way too strong). This why I ever dosing extensively in my online cooking course and even a dosage calculator tool in my free online dosing class (find both at http://www.Cannademy.com ). Dosing is also covered extensively in my new book The Easy Cannabis Cookbook (http://bit.ly/EasyCannabisCookbook) and in less detail on this website (but the basics are also here) in the Marijuana Cooking Tutorials section under the Cooking Basics tab.
All you have to do to get your medicated mayo is whisk together the egg yolks, the salt, vinegar, lemon juice, and mustard together. Make sure it’s mixed up well. Slowly add in the cannabis oil while still whisking the mixture. Do this carefully or risk making a huge mess. Once the oil is completely added in, continue to whisk the mixture until is begins to thicken. If it gets too thick, you can add a few drops of water to get the right consistency. Put the mayo in an airtight container and let it chill in the refrigerator for about two hours.
You deserve better than a limp joint and leftover pad Thai eaten by the light of the fridge. Live a little. Take that ganja and infuse it into butter, oil, milk, and sugar, and fuck around a bit. We're not talking boxed brownie mix; we're talking about a full-fledged gastronomical ball-out—apps, entrees, desserts, even some cocktails—that'll get you high and appease your munchies. Two birds, one stoner.

Next came the Dope Cup judges: Max Montrose, Jeff Greenswag, and Jim Nathanson. They work for a Colorado-based outfit called the Trichome Institute, named for the tiny crystal-like hairs that cover marijuana buds and leaves. Wolf ushered them into the living room, where smoking materials had been arrayed on the coffee table, including five cannisters with strains of marijuana from a local grower called 7 Points Oregon. “We have a Volcano”—a type of vaporizer—“set up and a couple of other things,” she said.
“When a person eats marijuana product they may not feel anything for a while,” says Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego. “And if they were doing it medicinally, they may say, ‘Well, maybe I didn’t have enough,’ and take some more, and then two hours later they’re very, very stoned.”
Pros: Edibles have demonstrated the longest-duration medicinal effect of any method of medication. Also, the total amounts of cannabinoids available through eating are multiplied and could have a much stronger effect than smoking. Coconut oil can be mixed with any foods to keep medication very discrete. Butter can also be used but use unsalted as it will separate. There are hundreds of recipes to meet dietary needs and taste pallets.
Dosing remains highly individualized and varies according to your symptoms and strength of the cannabis strain being used. As a general rule, try and maintain easily understood ratios between amounts of cannabis and butter or oil being infused. If your infused oil or butter is particularly strong, consider using only half infused and half non-infused, or whichever ratio works best for your specific needs. It’s incredibly important to keep your edibles out of reach of children or anyone else in your household who should not be using them. Make sure your edibles are properly marked and stashed safely away.
According to the Arcview Group, a market-research firm, the legal-marijuana business in Canada and the United States did almost seven billion dollars in sales last year. Arcview estimates that the industry will grow to more than twenty-two billion dollars by 2020. These profits have brought innovation. Cannabis can now be vaporized, absorbed under the tongue, or smoked in a hyper-concentrated form, a process known as dabbing. Edibles—a category that used to begin and end with the bone-dry pot brownie, served in a college dorm room—have been undergoing a particularly marked revolution. The finer dispensaries in Boulder now sell cannabis-infused candy, breath sprays, spritzers, and savory foods, from bacon to smoked salmon. In Los Angeles, thrill-seekers are paying as much as five hundred dollars a head to have a cannabis chef cater multicourse meals, pairing different cannabis strains with their culinary complements (heirloom-tomato bisque infused with a lemony Sour Diesel, for example).
If you have the luxury of being able to obtain your medicine from a legal dispensary near you, you may have noticed the large selection of edibles that are beginning to overflow the shelves. These pre-made, pre-packaged cannabis infused treats are more accessible to patients nowadays than ever before, but unfortunately many edibles still come packed with sugar, high fructose corn syrup, and other unhealthy ingredients. While these processed food delights can be an easy way to get medicated on the go, many medical marijuana patients prefer making their own medicated snacks and infused meals — and for good reason. Join us as we explore all of the popular cannabis cooking techniques and become a master chef in no time!

Preheat your oven to 350 F and line a non insulated cookie sheet with parchment paper. Take a knife or kitchen shears and CAREFULLY remove the kale leaves from the thicker stems. Cut up the leaves in to small, chip sized pieces. The actual size of the chip is up to you. I made mine about 1 inch by 1 inch. Be sure to wash the leaves thoroughly and dry them. Some people have access to a salad spinner but for those that don’t, I used paper towels and blotted them dry. Lay the kale out on the cookie sheet and slowly pour the cannabis olive oil over the the kale chips and then sprinkles with the sea salt and pepper, as well as any other spices that you’d like to add in. Place the chips in the oven and bake them until the edges begin to turn brown, absolutely no longer than 10 minutes. Let the chips cool off for a bit and your healthy, medicated snack is ready!
Cons: Without cannabinoids in the body, tolerance is very low so any exposure to THC smoke will result in a psychoactive rush many users try to avoid, so even though there are just a few parts of THC per CBD, smoking the oil is not recommended for those with very low tolerance. Also, smoking may agitate the throat and lungs, so heavy coughing may result.
This first-ever cookbook from High Times magazine—the world’s most trusted name when it comes to getting stoned—is the deliciously definitive guide to cannabis-infused cooking. Easy, accessible recipes and advice demystify the experience of cooking with grass and offer a cornucopia of irie appetizers and entrees, stoner sweets, cannabis cocktails, and high-holiday feasts for any occasion, from Time Warp Tamales and Sativa Shrimp Spring Rolls to Pico de Ganja Nachos and Pineapple Express Upside-Down Cake. Delectable color photos and recipes inspired by stoner celebrities such as Snoop Dogg, Cheech and Chong, and Willie Nelson will spark the interest of experienced cannabis cooks and “budding” chefs, whether they’re looking for the perfect midnight munchie or just to take dinner to a higher level.
Laurie & MaryJane’s brownies went on sale in February. They come in packages of five, which sell for twenty to thirty-three dollars, depending on potency. Wolf currently has them in thirty-five dispensaries and has developed new products: an almond-cake bite, a chocolate truffle, and a soon-to-be-launched savory cheese crisp. Ultimately, she hopes to conquer Oregon—and then to try for California. “The dream is to be everywhere it’s legal,” Wolf said, sounding a bit Big Weed herself. “To be the Mrs. Fields of cannabis foods.”
Edibles provide a way to consume your hash oil that affords the opportunity to activate the psychoactive cannabinoids.  You need only put your hash oil into your edible at the right time and temperature if you have some cooking expertise.  If you don’t, you can still enjoy great edibles.  Just prepare some hash oil butter first, then add to your food as you choose.
Wolf learned about food at friends’ homes and on vacations, which featured pit stops for roadside delicacies like fried apple pies. After college, at N.Y.U., she ran a catering business, then studied at the Culinary Institute of America, where her nickname was Noodles. She worked in several Manhattan restaurants, including the River Café and a small Upper East Side place called the Wine Bistro. In 1980, she met Bruce, who turned her on to food styling, the art of preparing food for photo shoots. She started doing freelance magazine work, writing recipes for Self, New York, and Mademoiselle, then moved to the parenting magazine Child, where, for nineteen years, she wrote a monthly column on family-friendly recipes.
reliably: McDonough even suggests using a method passed on to her by a food scientist that calls for spritzing decarbed bud with Everclear, an alcohol bottled at 190 proof, before infusing it into a fat, because the booze helps break down the plant cell walls, which “helps more THC escape into the solution and migrate out of the plant into the fat.”

A true stoner bakesale just wouldn’t be complete without the cupcakes! Cupcakes make a great all in one dessert bite and you’re sure to be amazed by just how delicious they can be with an added touch of canna-flour for an elevated kick that’s much more exciting than your grandmother’s recipe. These light and fluffy little cakes give you more than just a sugar high and you’ll be reaping the benefits of your baking in no time.
Last fall, the food writer Laurie Wolf invited me to a dinner party at her home. It promised to be a master class in rustic entertaining. Wolf lives in a floating house on the Willamette River, just south of Portland, Oregon. When she has people over, she told me, she has a few rules for herself. First, “have as much done in advance as possible.” She goes so far as to set the table the night before and put out serving platters with sticky notes assigning their contents. Next, be sure to check your guests’ dietary requirements. These days, everybody has a health concern or a food allergy, and she says, “I always try to accommodate in a big way.” Some of Wolf’s recommendations are more esoteric. For example: “Start with a sativa and end with an indica.” This applies only to Wolf’s area of expertise: marijuana edibles.
It depends on the strength of the kief and the tolerance of the person consuming it. Everyone responds drastically differently to cannabis, especially edible cannabis. While 10 mgs THC (the maximum per serving dose allowed in commercial edibles in many states) will be too much for some people, 100 mgs will not be enough for others. If you look at recipes for kief they recommend anywhere from 1/16 of a gram up to a gram (although in most cases that will be way too strong). This why I ever dosing extensively in my online cooking course and even a dosage calculator tool in my free online dosing class (find both at http://www.Cannademy.com ). Dosing is also covered extensively in my new book The Easy Cannabis Cookbook (http://bit.ly/EasyCannabisCookbook) and in less detail on this website (but the basics are also here) in the Marijuana Cooking Tutorials section under the Cooking Basics tab.

Amy Scattergood is a staff writer for the Food section of the Los Angeles Times. She has degrees from Yale Divinity School, the Iowa Writers Workshop and the Cordon Bleu and has written a book of poetry and co-written a whole grain cookbook. Although originally from Iowa, she’s lived in L.A. for a long time now and will continue to do so, as long as tacos and the Pacific Ocean exist.
Melissa Parks, a classically trained chef who once worked in research and development for General Mills, is now the executive chef of Las Vegas-based edibles company Vert. She once orchestrated a dinner where she paired tokes of cannabis with dishes that complemented their terpenes. She married a particularly earthy strain called Bio-Diesel (“It had smells of when you drive into a forest over dirt with pine needles”) with a cocoa- and coffee-crusted pork tenderloin in sour cherry beurre blanc.
Even though Memorial Day has passed in the States, the barbecues aren’t quite over yet! The 4th of July has yet to happen and there are plenty of weekends left with beautiful weather! Looking to spice up your usually normal barbecue with some cannabis fun? This recipe will teach you how to infuse your BBQ sauce with cannabis, not only giving you a great sauce but also an awesome way to medicate this summer.
The basic process is to put your decarboxylated weed and butter in a pot with a little water just to make sure the butter doesn’t burn, and heat on a low simmer for 3 to 6 hours. Long as the butter doesn’t burn, the longer you heat, the more cannabinoids you get in the butter. Some prefer to heat in a crockpot to 6 hours. Let it cool enough to handle, strain out the plant material and discard (the thc is now inside the butter!), then put it in the fridge overnight for it to harden. Next, remove the hardened butter from the residual water and you have your main ingredient, your precious canna butter infused with powerful cannabinoids. For more specific instructions on making canna butter, view our detailed explanation on Making the Marijuana Oil here: https://www.ncsm.nl/english/information-for-patients/cannabutter-oil-recipe
Yes it would work to just decarb during the cooking, but when we lab testing back to back edibles, those made with kief that had been decarbed first has about a 30% higher potency than those made with kief that only decarbed during the cooking process. That’s why I always recommend taking the extra step to decarb BEFORE cooking, even if it will be debarbed during as well.
Decarboxylated cannabis can (and has been) infused into a spectrum of household ingredients, from avocado oil to bacon fat, although some may be better conduits than others. In a trial where she infused and tested a number of vehicles, McDonough found that clarified butter and coconut oil produced especially potent solutions. Her hypothesis as to why? Saturated fats like butter and coconut oil are better able to absorb THC than monounsaturated fats like olive oil. “We’ll need to do more study,” she writes, “but in the meantime, all of you cannabis cooks at home can rest assured that using clarified butter or coconut oil for your cannabis infusions will result in a potent and cost-effective infusion.”
Healthy eating is important in the life of a stoner! Stir fry has always been a favorite of mine and now you can make it medicated! It’s a far cry from the food we made in Home Ec in middle school but it tastes even better, now that we’re old enough not to burn the veggies to the pan. You can add in veggies or meats if you feel like it and of course, more bud if you feel inclined. Just always remember that eating cannabis is much different than smoking cannabis and you should always know your tolerance before eating too much!

Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.
Process:In a small mason jar mix in 1 gram High CBD Hash Oil to 3 fl. oz. of high-proof alcohol. Seal lid on the jar and shake vigorously. Place mixture into freezer. Leave for a minimum of 5 days shaking the jar twice daily and placing back in the freezer. Using a coffee filter and a separate container, strain the liquid removing any impurities (there should be very little solids). Pour the tincture into the 1 fl. oz.  eyedroppers.
Wolf gave me a preview of the meal: marijuana-free chicken Marbella and couscous, paired with infused sides and appetizers. The dishes had been set out on a sideboard. Next to each one was a card with the potency level noted in calligraphy: “Stuffed Mushrooms, 5 mg THC each.” (Five milligrams of tetrahydrocannabinol is about the equivalent of a few puffs from a joint.) The secret to cooking with cannabis is fat. THC, the main psychoactive ingredient, bonds to fat molecules when heated. There are high-tech ways of doing this, but Wolf prefers to do it “the old-fashioned way, with good butter and good oil.” Her cookbooks always begin with recipes for what she calls canna-butter and canna-oil.

Now that we’ve gone over cannabis-infused oils, let’s dive into their similarly monikered cousin: cannabis oil. Similar to olive, vegetable, or coconut oil, cannabis oil is made through a chemical extraction process. There are a variety of methods that the marijuana industry uses to extract oil, resulting in similar but unique products. Most cannabis extraction methods involve a solvent, like butane or CO2—or extreme heat and pressure—to extract the cannabinoids. These processes can be time-consuming and usually involve expensive laboratory equipment. Without proper training and the right tools, extracting THC from weed using certain methods is downright dangerous. Unless you’re using a solventless method, the excess yield—or product that isn’t cannabis oil—needs to be removed in order for a clean, non-toxic final result. For those of us who aren’t chemistry experts, most methods of this process should be left to the professionals.

The effects of the weed lollipop are just as good as those of baked weed, but it comes on even slower, over an hour or two, and lasts even longer. Since it takes a while to dissolve the lollipop, you may be able to suck a lollipop for an hour, then immediately have another. You won’t have to worry about dosing because the time it takes to consume the lollipop will force you to be unable to overdose, unless of course you chew the lollipop rather than sucking. So, suck the weed lollipop, let it take at least an hour, and you can have another while waiting for the effects to begin over the next hour.


Combine oil and cannabis in your double-boiler or slow cooker, and heat the two together on low or warm for a few hours. This allows for decarboxylation (activation of THC) without scorching (which destroys the active ingredients). Cooking can be done a variety of ways: in a slow cooker on low for 4-6 hours, stirring occasionally; in a double-boiler on low for at least 6 hours (8 is better), stirring occasionally; or in a simple saucepan on low for at least three hours, stirring frequently (a saucepan is most susceptible to scorching). In all cases, a small amount of water can be added to the mixture to help avoid burning. Note: whatever method you choose, temperature of the oil should not exceed 245°F.

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