Support for legalized marijuana has increased exponentially over the last couple of decades. According to the Pew Research Center, 61 percent of Americans now support legalization, compared to just 31 percent in 2000. In the West, weed is a way of life: Recreational use is legal in Washington, Oregon, California, Colorado, Nevada and Alaska. And as legalization spreads to other states – it’s on the ballot in Michigan this November – many expect other entrepreneurs to lean on the example set by innovative Westerners. 
This book, based on the Munchies and Viceland television series “Bong Appétit,” was published in October by Ten Speed Press. (This is in itself notable, as Ten Speed is one of the best cookbook publishers around, and continues the legitimate trajectory of the cannabis cooking genre.) The book has a comprehensive introduction that includes topics such as dosing, techniques, methods of decarboxylation and infusion, cannabis pairing tips, questions to ask your dispensary, tips on equipment and more. The recipes are sourced from the Munchies test kitchen and from many well-known chefs, whose recipes are recalibrated to add cannabis. Thus: Korean fried chicken from Deuki Hong of San Francisco’s Sunday Bird; fried soft-shell crab with shishito pepper mole from Daniela Soto-Innes of Cosme and Atla; and (my favorite) Joan Nathan’s preserved lemons. The Munchies test kitchen also has some fun ones, including herb focaccia with, well, herb; and confit octopus, in which a whole octopus is poached in cannabis-infused olive oil. If that sounds too aspirational, there are instructions for making an apple bong — a hollowed-out apple filled with weed-infused mezcal — at the end of the drinks chapter.
Preheat oven to 350*. Grease 2 loaf pans with butter or cooking spray and set aside. In a large bowl mix sugar and cannabis butter using an electric hand mixer. Mix well & add the eggs, vanilla, and persimmon pulp and continue until all ingredients are mixed together really good. In a separate bowl sift your flour, baking soda, salt, spices, nuts, and raisins. When the nuts and raisins are evenly coated in the flour mixture slowly add a little at a time now using a wooden spoon to stir into your cannabis persimmon mixture until all ingredients are combined well.
 Make sure the pan you plan to use is nice and hot before you start adding batter. You can use 1/3 to 1/2 of a cup to determine how much should be poured into the pan. When your pan is hot enough, begin pouring in the batter and be ready to flip it when you see bubbles popping up throughout the batter. For even more simplicity, pour the batter into a waffle maker. Now all that’s left to do is grab the syrup and enjoy the most important meal of the day while cheesing from ear to ear, Marijuana Waffles!
This might sound real “back alley-ish” but use a drop…. literally a drop of canna-oil on a half teaspoon of olive oil and heat it over a candle. Once the oils heat up and you start to smell the thc, let it cool down slightly and then slowly drink it, drop it under your tongue. This taste funny but it’s worth it. I was high af for hours…munchies and everything.
The hash oil you purchased has very high concentrations of CBD, or cannabidiol which, as a nonpsychoactive cannabinoid, has demonstrated health benefits as a nutritional antioxidant, neuroprotector, and anti-inflammatory supplement. CBD attaches to receptors associated exclusively with inflammation and not receptors associated with euphoria. Thus, CBD does not get users “high”.

While some of us take pizza for granted, there are some patients that have sensitive stomachs and cannot ingest this delicious meal. Thankfully, there is a gluten free option out there. Seeing as how patients suffering from Celiac disease and cancer shouldn’t ingest gluten or sugar, it is shocking to see how many sweet edibles are found in dispensaries. This recipe is aimed for people who like to eat healthier pizza and patients. It’s easy to make, even from scratch, but be sure to have a bottle of cannabis infused olive oil handy to medicate the pizza to your liking!


Using oils under the tongue (holding it there for a minute to let them sink in) will provide the quickest effects, but most will still only kick in from 1-2 hours from the time you take it – and can last for as long as 6-10 hours in some cases. The initial onset and duration of cannabis oil is much longer than vaping or smoking because it’s absorbed through the digestive system and bloodstream, and it’s not recommended to take a second dose (whether edible or sublingual) until 4 solid hours have gone by.
“There are two different compounds in cannabis. One is THC, that’s the psychoactive cannabinoid that gets you high,” Jeff says. “But the lesser-known ‘little brother’ of THC is CBD, and that is a non-psychoactive medicinal compound in cannabis. And that’s what people use to treat seizures, and scientific studies are starting to show that it kills cancer cells and shrinks tumors.”
These treats make a great party favor or possibly just something for a hot summer night. Making delicious edibles is also a great way to impress your friends. A good marijuana cook can make the best dishes “special”. Your friends are sure to always come to you if they want some dank goodies. Who knows, if you’re good enough at baking them, maybe you can start your own edibles business! Not only are edibles a strong high, they’re a great way to medicate for patients that can’t smoke.
You can’t take a Le Cordon Bleu class in THC or crib from Julia Child or Thomas Keller. Due to federal regulations, it’s tough for medical researchers to investigate cannabis, let alone food science or culinary programs. Chefs working with cannabis are literally writing their own cookbooks and becoming amateur scientists in search of the perfect high enrobed in the perfect meal.
Preheat your over to 350 degrees F. While it heats up, mix the butter and the sugars together until they’re a very creamy, smooth consistency. Grab the two eggs and beat them in to the mix. After that, add in the baking soda and the flour, while still stirring consistently. Slowly pour the 1/4 cup of water in, along with all of the oatmeal packets. Continue to stir the mix until everything combines well. The mixture should be similar to cookie dough. Take bits of the mixture and roll them in to balls and place them on to a greased up cookie sheet. Place them in the preheated over for around 13-15 minutes until they are a golden brown color. Once they’ve hit that point, remove them from the oven and place them on to a plate to allow them to fully cool off. Now they’re ready to eat! Enjoy!
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.
I love the taste of smoked or vaped cannabis. I do not like the taste of it in my food. Most people do not, but I know a handful of folks who do. But from a culinary/flavor profile/foodie perspective, most often the flavor of cannabis does not enhance most recipes. Your taking offense to this is the equivalent of getting mad at someone because they don’t like the flavor of broccoli, or beer, or whatever. It’s just silly. If you like it, more power to you, cannabis cooking is a whole lot easier for you. But most of my readers do not like a strong cannabis flavor in their food and neither do I.
Perfecting the ultimate balance between sweet and spicy, ginger cookies have long been a wintertime favourite. If you’re using cannabis infused butter, make the recipe as is. However, if you’re adding your cannabis oil directly, you may want to slightly reduce the amount of (non-infused) butter you are using to maintain the correct amount of moisture. This recipe makes two dozen medium-sized cookies, so you’ll need to add that many doses of oil during the butter and molasses stage. All of the spice amounts here can be reduced or increased based on your preference. If you don’t have all of these spices on hand, using a pre-blended pumpkin pie spice will work almost as well (maybe with a little extra ground ginger added for good measure).
Amy Scattergood is a staff writer for the Food section of the Los Angeles Times. She has degrees from Yale Divinity School, the Iowa Writers Workshop and the Cordon Bleu and has written a book of poetry and co-written a whole grain cookbook. Although originally from Iowa, she’s lived in L.A. for a long time now and will continue to do so, as long as tacos and the Pacific Ocean exist.
So to take the taste out, you basically have to extract as much of that stuff as possible by soaking the bud for a couple of days in distilled water, and then after that, blanching it. By blanching, you're basically getting a much purer flower to start with and later to infuse into your butter or oil. It's still going to smell like cannabis, but if you cook with it, you won't taste anything. Most canna-butters are usually green or even black. Mine is yellow.

To store the mixture, you must first gently uncap the jug (don’t disturb what’s at the bottom) and put the tubing in to the jug, stopping about an inch from the bottom. Siphon the contents through the pipe, into the clean glass jug, through the muslin to make sure that no sediment gets through. You can toss out the old jug, along with the gross mess of stems at the bottom. Cap loosely and leave this jug alone for one month. Don’t move it or shake it. After a month has passed, siphon this jug in to the smaller, clean bottles from before, again through a layer of muslin. Seal them well. But you’re not going to enjoy your wine yet. You have to age it so put the bottles in a dark place and leave them for as long as you possibly can, even as long as six months to get the most out of your wine. After that time period, you should have a great tasting cannabis infused wine! Enjoy!
Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.
It should be known that the combination of cannabis and red wine is extremely beneficial for the human brain. A glass of red wine paired with smoking a joint repairs brain connections and protects them from further damage. Some stoners, unfortunately, find that smoking and drinking cause adverse effects that are unpleasant to say the least. It’s thought that the smoking is what causes the nausea so being able to ingest the two at the same time without that sick feeling would be perfect! Thankfully, there’s this recipe for cannabis infused red wine that you can enjoy, hopefully with out the negative feelings that sometimes accompany the two.
First, as always, preheat your oven to 350 degrees and be sure to put a center rack in the oven. Grease a 10x3in Bundt pan and sprinkle flour all over it. This will prevent the cake from sticking to the inside of the pan once it’s finished. You don’t want the cake to get stuck. It’ll make a mess and you will ruin your cake. It is also important that you leave all of your ingredients sitting out at room temp for at least 40 minutes before you start baking. This includes the eggs, buttermilk, and butter.
"The way Julia Child brought French cuisine to the uncultured American masses in her debut cookbook 'Mastering the Art of French Cooking' is what Elise McDonough and the editors at High Times Magazine have done with 'The Official High Times Cannabis Cookbook'. Informative and accessible, it's an essential staple for any 'budding' chef. Starting with a wide range of basics that bind THC to fat molecules (cannabis-infused butters, oils and tinctures plus bonus mayonnaise and flour recipes), the book ventures offers easy-to-prepare recipes that will have even the sober drooling (the photographs help). Highlights include 'Cheeto Fried Chicken' from Fresh Off the Boat author and chef Eddie Huang, a Thai-style Tom Yum 'Ganja' soup, a Thanksgiving turkey with a marijuana-infused marinade, and even latkes."
Place the sweet potatoes in a preheated oven at 400 degrees F until they are soft. Peel the potatoes and then mash them with 3 ounces of bud butter and 1 tablespoon of rum. Place this mixture aside for now and melt the remaining ounce of bud butter with a sauté pan. Add in the sugar and stir the mix until the sugar melts fully and it begins to bubble slowly. Toss in the grapefruit and sauté this all together until the liquid is reduced by about half. Grab your fresh grapefruit juice and add that in as well as the last 2 tablespoons of rum. Cook this all together for about a minute. Add this new mix in with the sweet potatoes and mix together well. Season with salt and pepper to taste if you would like and boom! These mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes are hot and ready to serve! Enjoy!
Ice extracts are a much safer way to obtain highly concentrated THC, rather than the “easier” butane method. Ice hash is clean and earthy, definitely something every stoner should try at some point. It’s not as difficult to make as some people think. Here’s a step by step tutorial on how to make ice hash yourself and get a good yield of some serious fire.
Cooking is a huge part of the holidays for most people. The main course is definitely important but what would that be without those delicious added bonus foods? Side dishes are always very important for the holiday meals. Everyone knows that mashed potatoes are probably the best part of any holiday. Take, for example, these mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes that also happen to be medicated. They taste good and get you high. With a very simple recipe (on a scale of 1 to 10, we give it about a 3), these sweet potatoes will be a hit at at any table this holiday season.
The first course was herbed white beans with grapefruit, blood orange and asparagus with heirloom carrot, sumac, pomegranate and 2 milligrams of THC. Then came hamachi and caviar alongside asparagus rolled in hemp seed; broccoli stalks with THC-infused habanero mousse and dandelion purée; and lamb Wellington anointed with a spice rub, mint pesto, and a THC-dosed lamb jus. Eight courses and 10 milligrams later, the guests had grown convivial, suit jackets slung over chairs, giggling as a live cellist played in the background. By the end, says chef Chris Sayegh, everyone was “euphoric.”
Did you cook the butter with water? If so sometimes you will have residual water left after straining. I strain and then heat gently to remove any residual water as it can cause mold if left for long periods, then do a secondary straining to get rid of any other sediment. If you did not add water to the mix, I am not sure where it would be coming from.
Well, there are several reasons for me to purchase this book. First of all, I was intrigued by .. let's say new opportunities. And I was also curious about a recommendation for choosing and buying a proper weed. And yes, Cannabis infused BBQ sauce is that thing I've dreamed about for a while. I have found answers for all my questions about marijuana ingesting in this particular book. Actually, I've found much more information here.
Yep, you got it! The only difference for me when making topicals is I decarb some of it and leave some undecarbed so I get full spectrum (both THC-A and CBD-A along with THC and CBD). This is optional, but I find it makes the most effective topicals. I am currently at work on a new online course about making cannabis topicals, but you are definitely on the right track.

Take a small pot and add in your cannabis and Everclear. Keep the heat on medium low, at a simmer but never at a boil. This heat will burn off a lot of the alcohol, hopefully allowing you to drink this lemonade without getting hammered. The alcohol is in the recipe in order to extract the THC from the cannabis. After you have brought the cannabis and alcohol up to the right temp, add in half of the glass of water. The mixture should cook until about half of it is evaporated. Then, strain the mixture through cheese cloth to remove any leftover cannabis sediment. Be sure to squeeze the cheesecloth out to make sure that you get all of the trapped liquid. Then, you can add in the rest of the water, freshly squeezed lemon juice, and sugar as you see fit. Store this drink in the fridge! Enjoy!

Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.

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