Thinking about baking? Well canna-flour is exactly what it takes to make your sweet treats that much sweeter and requires so little preparation, you’d be crazy not to keep a batch on hand. You’re going to be needing very finely ground marijuana for this one, so maybe a few runs through the grinder plus a little added man power to make it dust like. Don’t feel bad about beating the crap out of your nuggets, they’re being put to good use.

Two of the early taste-testers were her son, Nick, and his wife, Mary. Growing up, Nick was not a marijuana user. “I was a pure DARE kid,” he told me. His mother was disappointed—which was probably the point. “I was, like, ‘Come on! A little pot,’ ” Wolf said. “We were terrified that he was going to become a Republican.” Mary grew up in Oklahoma, where her father was an Episcopal priest. She met Nick while working in marketing for a financial firm in New York. When Wolf began making her almond treats, she gave the couple a few samples, along with a cookie from another baker. They made the mistake of eating the entire cookie before deboning a chicken. (They had joined a “chicken share.”) As the edible kicked in, Nick recalled, he began to get the impression that he was deboning a baby. “I was, like, ‘This feels like human skin! I can’t do this anymore!’ ” He spent the night curled up by the toilet. Mary was calmer. “I just left the chicken there and went to bed,” she said. The experience put them off edibles for months, and spurred Wolf to make a low-dose version of the almond bar, with only twenty-five milligrams of THC.
Amy Scattergood is a staff writer for the Food section of the Los Angeles Times. She has degrees from Yale Divinity School, the Iowa Writers Workshop and the Cordon Bleu and has written a book of poetry and co-written a whole grain cookbook. Although originally from Iowa, she’s lived in L.A. for a long time now and will continue to do so, as long as tacos and the Pacific Ocean exist.

Cannabis cooking oils like olive, peanut, or canola are great ways to inject THC into your meal. Cook with it as you would normally, just be mindful of how much you’re using since the effects of ingesting cannabis are slower to set in and last much longer than smoking. Ideas: saute veggies, roast potatoes, marinate meat, or mix up a vinaigrette for your favorite salad.

please help me with this confusion. Ideally, decarboxylation takes place at a temperature just over 200 for about just under an hour. This is accomplished in boiling water, which reaches and maintains about 212 degrees. So if I boil the herb at that temp for an hour, isn’t that decarboxylating it? Why do it in the oven first and then do it again in the saucepan? What am I missing?


“Edibles” is a just-published, user-friendly cookbook in a few notable ways: There is a lengthy and well-defined introductory section that discusses dosage, potency, effects, terminology and techniques. The 30 recipes that follow are purposefully low-dose (5 milligrams per serving), which is very helpful for beginning cooks, as well as those with a potentially problematic sweet tooth (Stephanie Hua is a confectioner at a marshmallow company; she and Coreen Carroll met at culinary school in San Francisco). The recipes are also a lot more appealing than those in many cannabis cookbooks, which can tend to run a little toward dorm food. Hua and Carroll instead give well-written recipes for cardamom caramels, gruyère and green garlic gougères, strawberry jam Pavlovas and roasted grape crostini. The blueberry lemon French macarons are a serious improvement on pot brownies.
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Support for legalized marijuana has increased exponentially over the last couple of decades. According to the Pew Research Center, 61 percent of Americans now support legalization, compared to just 31 percent in 2000. In the West, weed is a way of life: Recreational use is legal in Washington, Oregon, California, Colorado, Nevada and Alaska. And as legalization spreads to other states – it’s on the ballot in Michigan this November – many expect other entrepreneurs to lean on the example set by innovative Westerners. 
Slowly pour the tincture through the cheesecloth in to the jar. Be careful and do this slowly! If you rush, you run the risk of overfilling the cheesecloth and having a serious mess on your hands… And all over the rest of your kitchen too! Pour slowly. If the cloth gets too full of powder, change it. Once you’ve strained all of the mixture, squeeze the cheesecloth. A lot of glycerin gets stuck in there and if you don’t squeeze it, you’ll lose a lot of the product.

No! That would be disastrous. Hash and kief are NOTHING like flour. You can make your regular cookie recipe with the regular amount of flour and simply stir in an appropriate amount of finely ground decarboxylated kief or hash that will give you the dose you are seeking into your batter and bake as usual. But hash and kief are by no means a substitute for flour.
The first step is to decarboxylate your flower. Ideally, do not grind it but rather break it up into popcorn sized nugs, but it is fine to use shake or ground bud as well. Throw your cannabis right in your decarboxylator (putting it in silicon or a shot glass if you’re using kief/concentrates) and let it run its cycle while you gather your ingredients.
Concocting your own pot brownies has long been a haphazard and inexact science for recreational stoners—instructions will vary on the amount of bud and method of infusion, and often DIY cannabis cooks pay no mind to the potency of the strain they're using. And while residents living in states where medical marijuana is legalized can buy a wide-range of dank, delicious edibles from dispensaries, the average pot enthusiast is more likely to dump an ounce of mids into some brownie batter than whip up something digestible if left to his own devices in an amateur cannabis kitchen.
Pour 12 doses of cannabis oil into a measuring cup at least 1 cup in size. Once the cannabis oil has been added, top it up with the melted coconut oil until you have a total of 3/4 cup of coconut oil and cannabis oil combined. Whisk the cannabis-coconut oil combination thoroughly to make sure that the cannabis has been evenly distributed into the coconut oil. This is a very important step to ensure that each muffin has equal doses of cannabis. Add the cannabis-coconut oil combination to the wet ingredients (large bowl) and whisk together ingredients, making sure to evenly mix the cannabis-coconut oil into the wet ingredients.

 Now for the spice! Add the canna-oil, salt, ground pepper, Lawry’s seasoned salt, and last but not least, garlic powder. Then cut both the lemon and lime in half and squeeze one half of the lime and lemon in to the guac. Mix everything together, grab your favorite tortilla chips and look at your masterpice! Now all there’s left to do is dip, bite, and get high.
Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!
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