“When a person eats marijuana product they may not feel anything for a while,” says Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego. “And if they were doing it medicinally, they may say, ‘Well, maybe I didn’t have enough,’ and take some more, and then two hours later they’re very, very stoned.”
Wolf’s mixed nuts have had a lot of traction. She adapted them from a Danny Meyer recipe and added infused coconut oil, a staple in her kitchen because it can also be used topically, “so you’re getting more bang for your buck.” (An elderly friend of Wolf’s rubs it on his hands to treat his rheumatoid arthritis.) Wolf’s newest book, “Cooking with Cannabis,” emphasizes comfort foods like mac and cheese and meatloaf. There’s a chapter called “Recipes for One,” intended for solo eaters. “It’s great to be able to make yourself ramen,” she said. (The cannabis goes in the broth, mixed with sesame oil.)
How would you recommend carboxylating/activating the cannabinoid that can’t be metabolized without such processes? I read somewhere that the temperature required for that is around 240 F, but I’m unsure about whether or not this would be critical for cooking. I normally make brownies and I suspect that baked goods probably don’t get anywhere near that temperature in the center. I like the idea of having water in with the oil, but I don’t want to limit the efficacy of my oil. Do you think that I could heat the oil to 240 F after I strain It?
Wolf is sometimes called the Martha Stewart of edibles. The designation owes something to superficial similarities. At sixty-two, Wolf resembles a crunchier version of the domestic icon: she has an ample figure, graying hair, and glasses, and she wears loose linen outfits, generally paired with Crocs. But the designation also refers to her role as an educator, schooling people on how best to cook with marijuana. She is the author or co-author of several cookbooks, including “Herb,” which seeks to “elevate the art and science of cooking with cannabis” and “The Medical Marijuana Dispensary,” which features soothing dishes, like stuffed sweet potato, that will get you stoned. Her recipes appear in all the major cannabis publications: High Times, Dope, and Culture, as well as the Cannabist, a Denver Post Web site devoted to the booming legal-marijuana industry. There you can watch her instructional videos on making infused delicacies like the creamy chicken-based Mama Leone’s soup. (“This soup is worth its weight in weed.”)

If you’ve experimented with other forms of cannabis before, your sensitivity to THC is a key factor in what kind of oil to choose. If you enjoy the typical “high”, picking a THC-rich oil would kick that up a notch, whereas oils with higher concentrations of CBD often have reduced THC values and therefore feel more toned down. It’s recommended that most people start with a CBD-rich oil or an evenly balanced CBD-THC oil, observe, and then gradually increase the amount of THC. 
"Written by a ten-year veteran of the iconic magazine, Elise McDonough, the cookbook is humorous yet educational and compassionate yet still strongly counter-culture, as befitting the magazine's 40-year legacy. For those people who require medibles in their own lives or make them as part of underground compassionate care groups...the book is a highly useful tool." -Houston Press
Marijuana cooking with concentrates, namely kief and hash, opens up a whole new world of recipes that can be converted to cannabis cooking.  A lot of these recipes contain far less fat than ones that depend on butter or oil to carry the medication, an important consideration for those trying to curb calories or limit fats. Of course cannabis metabolizes better with some fat, but when you cook with concentrates, you eliminate the need to add extra oil or butter to achieve a proper dose.

Take the sugar, syrup, and water and mix them together in a pot. Set it on the stove over a medium heat and stir them together until they ingredients dissolve. The mixture should begin to boil after a bit. Make sure that all of your ingredients have been mixed well! After the mixture begins to boil, slowly add the color and flavoring to the pot. Your mixture should be heated to about 300 degrees. This part is a little tricky because you have add the tincture very quickly. Speed is necessary at this part in the process because the liquid solidifies as soon as it begins to cool. Once you’ve quickly stirred in the tincture, pour the liquid in to your molds and let them set.
Using cannabis as a medicine begins with understanding the basic science of decarboxylation, and why it is a crucial process in making edibles, tinctures and topical treatments. To get the full medicinal value out of your cannabis, it needs to be heated to a temperature that is just not possible to obtain in the human digestive system. The major downside of decarboxylating is that some of the more volatile terpenes (and other aromatics) that give the plant its signature aroma and flavor are lost during the process. Adding an equal amount of raw material to the decarboxylated materials may improve the taste and/or smell of your creations, but learning how to properly decarboxylate cannabis from the get-go will save you a lot of time, energy, money and product when cooking with cannabis.
With summer fast approaching, people are beginning to get prepared for backyard barbecues and trying to look killer in a bathing suit. So while we do understand that candies and confections make great edibles, not everyone wants to mow down on brownies right before beach season. But what if you want to be healthy and get stoned at the same time? Easy enough with this simple recipe for grilled peach cannabis salad. This dish will be perfect for a get together with friends or something to make and store for lunches throughout the week. The recipe comes from Roxanne Dennant at Fruit Slabs, a vegan fruit-leather that’s made for healthy people on the go. The salad, while spicy, remains sweet with the taste of summer.
Learn how to get baked with a delicious taste; Cannabutter is just the start. This cannabis cookbook will teach you the ins and outs of cannabis-infused cooking and guide you step by step on your journey to become the guy or girl that others come to for their edibles. In this book you’ll find 40 recipes for delicious edibles and cannabis infused meals to make from the comfort of your own kitchen.
Likewise, if you ever find yourself with a weak batch of food, eat more! If you make a batch of infused butter or oil that is less potent than you’d like, you can always augment it later by heating gently to dissolve some decarboxylated kief or hash into it before using in recipes.  I know marijuana is an expensive ingredient and the natural urge is to use as little as possible.  But think of it this way, you can always eat smaller portions, but if your batch of edibles does not deliver, there’s no way to avoid disappointment.  I won’t say that you “wasted” the weed as you will still be getting medicinal benefits even if you don’t feel high, but if you were expecting/desiring a buzz and you use too little, then you certainly did not put your plant material to its optimal use. Learn more about dosing at this link.

Take Viceland’s Bong Appétit, by far the biggest hit of the genre. Last year, it was nominated for a James Beard award, a top honor in the cooking world. The first two seasons featured dreamy sequences about sourcing local ingredients, bite-sized lessons in how to infuse various fats and oils with marijuana and, at the end of each episode, a giggle-ridden dinner party populated by the kind of chill stoners who would never judge you for being too high. (I found this out when I appeared on an episode that aired last summer.)
As Hukill demonstrated how to make the perfect pot brownie Saturday afternoon, Basil leaned forward in his seat and asked if cannabis could be infused into foods other than desserts. Before Hukill could answer, other attendees – many of them Portland residents who have played with cannabis in their own kitchens – piped up. Toss Brussels sprouts in cannabis-infused butter, one suggested. Find an online recipe for cannabis-infused simple syrup, said another, and have fun mixing cocktails.
Decarbing…. it sounds like your oven is not going to cut it for that. The slow cooker, unfortunately, does not get hot enough to properly do the job. I even tried under pressure in my Instant Pot and it only worked so-so. I don’t imagine you have a sous vide machine, most people don’t, but if you did this would work. It is basically a boil in bag but very temperature controlled. The other solution is a bit pricey, but I do like the Ardent decarboxylator as it takes away all the guesswork and gives perfect results every time (enter the coupon code CANNACHERI and $30 bucks off, thanks to the reader who asked for a discount code cause the company gave me one http://bit.ly/cheri-ardent). You can read my review of this gadget at https://www.cannabischeri.com/lifestyle/reviews/cannabis-product-reviews-ardent-decarboxylator-nova/ .
In most instances, oil will rise to the top of the water but won’t solidify.  No problem.  You can use a spoon to skim the oil off the water.  Even better is a kitchen gadget called a gravy separator that looks like a small pitcher with the spout originating on the bottom.  This unique design allows the water to be poured out while retaining every drop of the oil floating at the top.  During the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, gravy separators are sold everywhere, otherwise find them at gourmet shops.  You can also find extra large gravy separators year round at restaurant supply stores.

With summer fast approaching, people are beginning to get prepared for backyard barbecues and trying to look killer in a bathing suit. So while we do understand that candies and confections make great edibles, not everyone wants to mow down on brownies right before beach season. But what if you want to be healthy and get stoned at the same time? Easy enough with this simple recipe for grilled peach cannabis salad. This dish will be perfect for a get together with friends or something to make and store for lunches throughout the week. The recipe comes from Roxanne Dennant at Fruit Slabs, a vegan fruit-leather that’s made for healthy people on the go. The salad, while spicy, remains sweet with the taste of summer.
Grind your marijuana. You want to start with dry marijuana. You may choose to stick with only the flowers. Some people will use all parts of the plant.[4] Keep in mind that you will want to strain your oil later. Try not to grind your pot so finely that it will go through your strainer. A coffee grinder or food processor will work well. Just don't turn your marijuana into powder.
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.
Ratios and amounts are a personal thing. The recipes on this site use 1/2 ounce per cup of butter, for myself i usually use double that amount. Take my free dosing class to learn more at http://www.Cannademy.com. I am not a fan of the Magical Butter Machine and do not recommend it as I do not recommend finely grinding your plant material and machine forces you to do that.
There is absolutely no single way to answer that question. Not even close. What kind of edibles? Plus at what dosage? Everyone is drastically different. Check out the articles on dosing on this website and also my free edibles dosing class at http://www.Cannademy.com. The beauty of making your own is you get to make the exact edibles you like at the dosage YOU individually need.
While some of us take pizza for granted, there are some patients that have sensitive stomachs and cannot ingest this delicious meal. Thankfully, there is a gluten free option out there. Seeing as how patients suffering from Celiac disease and cancer shouldn’t ingest gluten or sugar, it is shocking to see how many sweet edibles are found in dispensaries. This recipe is aimed for people who like to eat healthier pizza and patients. It’s easy to make, even from scratch, but be sure to have a bottle of cannabis infused olive oil handy to medicate the pizza to your liking!
It’s nearly impossible to ingest a lethal amount of marijuana. But people can do dangerous things while under the influence. In one notorious case, in 2014, a nineteen-year-old man jumped off a roof in Denver after eating a pot candy given to him by friends. This and other events prompted the state of Colorado to run a campaign called “Good to Know,” aimed at tourists and others whom Andrew Freedman, the state’s director of marijuana coördination at the time, called “the marijuana naïve.” The Dowd column “was our best possible public-education campaign” about the dangers of overconsuming, Freedman told me. The state has since changed its packaging rules, mandating that products like chocolate bars be split into clearly marked doses of ten milligrams.
By the time you finish mixing together your marijuana/egg/food coloring mix, the ham that’s been cooking should be done. Remember to keep an eye on it while mixing up the eggs as well, to make sure that it doesn’t burn. When the ham has finished cooking to your liking, pour the eggs over the ham in the frying pan. Continue to cook the eggs and ham together until the eggs are scrambled (it shouldn’t take too long). Serve up your green eggs and ham with some toast (preferably with medicated butter or jelly on top!) and enjoy your holiday!
As Hukill demonstrated how to make the perfect pot brownie Saturday afternoon, Basil leaned forward in his seat and asked if cannabis could be infused into foods other than desserts. Before Hukill could answer, other attendees – many of them Portland residents who have played with cannabis in their own kitchens – piped up. Toss Brussels sprouts in cannabis-infused butter, one suggested. Find an online recipe for cannabis-infused simple syrup, said another, and have fun mixing cocktails.
Drummer, like many cannabis chefs, works closely with a trusted supplier that tests its products for potency in labs. Once she creates a butter or an oil, she then has that product tested. Finally, diners are presented with menus that describe the dosage of each dish. She tries to keep four-course menus at “well under” 60 milligrams of THC, spread out over a leisurely meal so that diners can indulge. For comparison, “legal state” Colorado considers 10 milligrams to be a single dose. The effect of a single dose varies from person to person, and from smoking to eating.
How to make Marinated Mushrooms with Marijuana! This is really exciting, and these mushrooms can be served with rice, fish, cut up in soups, or eaten alone and can add some much needed flare to your meal. Being that mushrooms are so diverse, there’s really no limit to what you can do with these and they also would make a great topping on pizza. You can think of these guys as a much more tasty, much more milder form of psychedelic mushrooms. Now that you’re more than eager to have a taste, let’s cook some!
I am the only person I know of who does not recommend you finely grind your weed. I do not understand whay so many people are obsessed with finely grinding the plant material. What you are trying to extract is ON the plant, not in it. The more grinding, the more plant particulate in your food and the yuckier the flavor, IMO. I use a coarse hand grinder or my fingers to break up the plant material, no more.

Pour the ounce of ground cannabis into the upper chamber and mix well with the wooden spoon. Allow the mixture to continue to simmer for 30-40 minutes, stirring regularly, until the liquefied butter turns emerald green. While the butter is infusing, wipe out the large mixing bowl that held the cannabis, stretch a piece of cheese cloth across the rim and secure it with a rubber band.
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.
By the time you finish mixing together your marijuana/egg/food coloring mix, the ham that’s been cooking should be done. Remember to keep an eye on it while mixing up the eggs as well, to make sure that it doesn’t burn. When the ham has finished cooking to your liking, pour the eggs over the ham in the frying pan. Continue to cook the eggs and ham together until the eggs are scrambled (it shouldn’t take too long). Serve up your green eggs and ham with some toast (preferably with medicated butter or jelly on top!) and enjoy your holiday!
Have all equipment ready because you have to move fast to make candy. Drop your water, corn syrup, and sugar into your saucepan and cook on high until the sugar dissolves. Now drop to medium heat for 15 mins then check with the thermometer until you reach 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Now remove from heat and add your drops of green food coloring, canna oil and peppermint flavoring. Pour your liquid into the pan and let it cool. Once it is semi-hard, use your molds or scissors to cut it into your desired shape. If you have used a half ounce of weed in your oil, cut into 14 or 28 pieces the size of a jolly rancher. Now toss the pieces into the pan buttered with canna butter or oil and get them nice and greasy. Next, take your baking dish and cover it in powdered sugar. Take the greasy candy pieces and roll them in the powdered sugar. Next, insert the lollipop sticks and let your candy harden. Now you have weed lollipops with the appropriate doses. Each lollipop is a bowl of smoked weed. Use this simple recipe and you will impress your friends and have a great way to enjoy the effects of marijuana without smoking, and without having to eat cookies or brownies. Even though it’s sugar, you will tend to take in fewer calories with candies than with baked cookies.
Nevertheless, the column brought up a hazard of cannabis edibles: eating too much can lead to a terrible experience. Symptoms include hallucinations, panic attacks, and paranoia. What’s more, different individuals’ responses to a given amount of cannabis can vary wildly. They’re affected by tolerance levels, but also by sex, age, genetics, and even what the person has eaten that day. Wolf admitted that this complicates the very idea of responsible dosing. “Tiny people can eat a two-hundred-milligram squib”—a powerful gummy candy—“and they barely feel it. Then there are three-hundred-pound men who eat one of our brownies, which have a five- to ten-milligram THC dose, and it wipes them out.” Since the effects of edibles take a long time to kick in—anywhere from thirty minutes to two hours on average—it’s easy for novice users to overindulge, resulting in horror stories along the lines of those described in a tweet by the comedian Bill Dixon:
Also, if you do plan on straining the milk, you can save what gets taken out of the mix and dry it. Store this mixture to use in edibles later! It’s always nice to have a recipe that reuses ingredients more than once, making sure to get as much benefit as possible from everything. This milk can also be flavored with all kinds of natural flavors! For this season, cinnamon would be absolutely perfect. Of course, try out a bunch and pick your favorite! Enjoy your healthy, delicious hempseed milk!
Regrind the unground parts. The unground parts left in your strainer need to be reprocessed. If you have a coffee grinder, send them through a second time. If you are not getting the result you hoped for or if you started with a food processor, move the unground parts to a mortar and pestle. Apply pressure with the mortar and "stir" the unground parts to produce the necessary grinding action.
It should be known that the combination of cannabis and red wine is extremely beneficial for the human brain. A glass of red wine paired with smoking a joint repairs brain connections and protects them from further damage. Some stoners, unfortunately, find that smoking and drinking cause adverse effects that are unpleasant to say the least. It’s thought that the smoking is what causes the nausea so being able to ingest the two at the same time without that sick feeling would be perfect! Thankfully, there’s this recipe for cannabis infused red wine that you can enjoy, hopefully with out the negative feelings that sometimes accompany the two.
Summer calls for awesome snacks! Ice cream especially is something that stoners love to munch on. It cures both the munchies and cotton mouth, placing it at the top of the stoner food pyramid. The following recipe will give you about a quart of delicious (and of course, medicated) key lime pie. You’ll be sure to love this amazing creation and your friends will be incredibly impressed by how good and baked this ice cream will get them!
Hukill called 2.8 milligrams “perfect for a beginner,” adding that marijuana edibles are not meant to be consumed en masse. In other words, when you ingest edibles and get the munchies, reach for something else. Another tip: Remember that cannabis-infused foods take longer to get into your system compared to smoking or vaping. Give time for the high to hit.

Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.
In those days, dispensaries catered to what Wolf calls “the medical-stoner community,” heavy users and people with chronic pain. The edible offerings were informal. “You’d say, ‘What kind of edibles do you have?’ They’d say, ‘Well, my grandmother makes these pot brownies. And my stepmother’s cousin makes these.’ ” The dosage was usually very high—over a hundred milligrams of THC in a single brownie. The taste was “dreadful,” Wolf said. “It was like somebody took a bud and dipped it in chocolate.”

Just to be clear you can decarb your dry ice hash/kief and then mix it into dishes that don’t need cooking? I just made awesome tempered almond chocolates with 3 grams of kief, seems potent so far. With my honeys and maple syrup seems like it would be better not to heat them for so long if the hash is already decarbed. I have had problems using plant materials and getting mold so I turned all the trim we had into CO2 hash! We have over 200 grams so I can cook with it. It’s also super potent in my vaporizer.
Hi, Congratulations on making your first batch! The short answer is yes, you need a double boiler. I will tell you that coconut oil on the double boiler is not the simplest method. It does require you to watch the infusion that it does not get too hot or too thick, as moisture will escape during the process, thickening your infusion. Also be certain to not let the water boil off in the bottom vessel. A candy thermometer will definitely come in handy to ensure your infusion temps stay below 180 degrees (I like 140 or so). Personally, I recommend using a crock pot or slow cooker. You don’t have to watch it all the time like you do with a double boiler and you can be sure your temps will not get too high. I go over both these methods in detail in my Cannabis Cooking For Home Cooks course. You should check it out.
 Cover them with plastic wrap and let it sit in the fridge for about 2 hours or longer. (The longer it chills in the marinade the better the taste and the high) After the time passes, preheat your grill to high heat and pour some of the chicken juice on the grill to oil it up and further cook the flavor into the legs. Now put the chicken on the grill and pour the rest of the mixture over top it right after throwing it on the grill.
Using cannabutter or cannabis canola oil in baked goods are classic ways to make edibles, but a lot of people have started using cannabis coconut oil in their favorite sweet treats since it’s vegan and paleo-friendly. You can also use infused olive oil in your baked goods although it’s important to know that most olive oils have a strong flavor that may change the flavor of your finished goodie.

Cannabis-infused salves and topicals deliver quick pain relief and a feeling of relaxation to your muscles, without any psychoactive effects. Coconut oil infusions are a good choice for creating your own pain salves because coconut oil is a great transporter of CBD from your skin into your body’s cannabinoid receptors. Better CBD absorption means more relief for sore muscles, arthritis, and other localized pains. It also becomes as easy as adding your infused coconut oil into a non-cannabis product you already own and love!


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How to Make Cannabis Infused Rice Crispy Treats Even though we are all adults here, we all crave the comfort foods of our childhood from time to time. Honestly, who can resist the ooey-gooey goodness of melted marshmallow mixed with warm rice crispies — especially when they are infused with your favorite plant? Talk about an irresistible combination for nearly anyone but diabetics. Making a good batch of weed infused rice crispy treats comes down to using high-quality ingredients and following a few simple directions. Use this helpful step-by-step guide to get started with your first batch of canna-crispies: You …
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