Now, removed the cakes from the muffin pan and let them cool. Once they’ve cooled off, you can start frosting them. Stack whichever colors you want in any way. Frost each layer so that they stick together. If you need to, stick it with a toothpick. The ones I made were a huge mess. Delicious. But a mess. When cut in half, these little surprises will impress all of your friends, especially if you’ve added bud to them! And as always, you can add however much or however little weed you want to. It all depends on your preference! Enjoy!

That evening’s festivities were business, of a kind. Dope, a “cannabis lifestyle” magazine, was hosting its annual Oregon Dope Cup in Portland. The event is one of many that aspire to be the Oscars of the legal-cannabis industry. Laurie & MaryJane had won a Best Edible trophy at the previous Dope Cup, in Seattle, for its savory nuts. Last year, the company agreed to host an edibles dinner for the magazine’s guests, including the cup’s judges, who had flown in from Colorado.


After 24 hours, turn the crockpot off. Let it sit for a while and cool off. I waited about 20 minutes. When the glycerin has cooled, put on your gloves and put the cheesecloth over the mouth of the mason jar. I took the circle part of the jar and screwed it back on over the cloth to keep in in place. I also folded the cloth over itself about four or five times to ensure that I strained out all of the leftover marijuana powder.


When I arrived at Wolf’s house for dinner, she was puttering around the kitchen. The rest of the Wolf family—which is also a kind of professional support team—congregated in the living room. Laurie’s husband, Bruce, is a commercial photographer who takes all the pictures for his wife’s columns. Their adult son, Nick, works at an education startup, but his wife, Mary, a thirty-two-year-old Oklahoman, is Wolf’s business partner. She helps run their baked-goods operation, which sells a line of edibles under the name Laurie & MaryJane. Bruce made a joke about the family business: “They call us the Wolf Cartel.”
Butter is used in a multitude of recepies in cooking and is loved by many, but spread this stuff on your toast in the morning and everyone around will just have to watch you float away, and then ask you for some. Canna-butter is one of the most commonly used forms of cannabis when it comes to cooking and whipping up edibles because of its versatility, and the fact that it’s pure genius in butter form.

Many different extraction methods are detailed, including cannabutter, vegetable oils, and even nut butters. The thing that makes this cookbook really unique is the dosing chart, which allows you to find exactly the right dose while you are cooking and measuring out your cannabis infused oils. This means no more surprises and doses that you can customize for your particular needs.
Part of weed culture since the 1960s, weed butter can be made in a variety of ways. The process begins with some version of decarboxylation—or activating the THC. (Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is the psychoactive chemical compound of cannabis—what gets you stoned and what separates marijuana from hemp.) Decarboxylation can be done a multitude of ways, but typically involves cooking the weed at a low temperature for a prolonged period of time in butter or oil. Keep in mind, however, like any other dish you’re making, too much time in the oven or too much heat will torch the ingredients—rendering the THC ineffective.
The daughter of legendary singer and songwriter, Bob Marley, penned this compilation of recipes that fits right in with Marley Natural’s clean, green, holistic lifestyle brand. It gives readers the chance to try their hands at making some of her family’s favorite (mostly vegetarian) Jamaican recipes. Intimate stories of her life growing up on the island, insight into how she includes cannabis in her personal wellness routine, and directions for infused beauty treatments accompany this robust collection of recipes.
Oils go rancid whether infused or not and exposure to light and heat can increase this. You are likely safe for 2 to 3 months at least. Store for 6 months or more int he freezer, then just remove the amounts you need when you need it. BUT be cautious that you have removed ALL the moisture after infusing. I have had coconut oil grow mold, even in the fridge, as I did not get ALL the water out.

You sound biter about the taste of weed. If done without any care, yeah it taste like shit but weed can add some awesome flavor if done correctly. I made a lemon meringue pie with cannabis once and the flower really made it something special. No ass taste, just good lemon flavor complemented by the weed. too much weed and it starts to taste funny like you said but just the right amount is great. Too much of a good thing is never good.
It’s clear that if you cook your weed, you get a longer, stronger, and more legal experience than smoking marijuana but there are a few cons. The most obvious is that you don’t get as acutely high from pot edibles as you do from smoking marijuana. The second con is that dosing is much easier smoking weed than it is with edibles. Overdosing on edibles can produce a frightening experience but is usually not physically dangerous. The third con is simply that it takes about an hour to feel effects of edibles.

Depending on how many baked goods you’d like to make, it should be somewhat easy to divide it up accordingly, once you’ve determined how many mgs of THC you have in your batch. The maximum legal amount in recreationally available edibles ranges from 5mg to 20mg per edible, depending on state law, however you’re not bound by these limitations. If you’re not sure about your perfect dose or are inexperienced with edibles, 3-5 mgs would be a good starting point.


You can’t take a Le Cordon Bleu class in THC or crib from Julia Child or Thomas Keller. Due to federal regulations, it’s tough for medical researchers to investigate cannabis, let alone food science or culinary programs. Chefs working with cannabis are literally writing their own cookbooks and becoming amateur scientists in search of the perfect high enrobed in the perfect meal.
Not to be outdone, Netflix pushed out its own marijuana cooking show this summer: Cooking on High, which pits two chefs against each other to create THC-enhanced dishes for a panel of judges, punctuated by cannabis education from loveable pothead comedian Ngaio Bealum. Though critical reception of the fell flat, some of the chefs and personalities featured within seem destined for another, better executed vehicle for stardom. One standout was Andrea Drummer, whose delectable cod cake sandwich made her the winner of the show’s first episode. Drummer trained at Le Cordon Bleu, and oddly enough used to work as a drug prevention counselor before getting into weed cooking about five years ago.
The recipes on this site are calculated on using a 1/2 ounce to 1 cup butter, which in most cases will be pretty strong (depending on the strength of the cannabis of course). When cooking for myself, I will often double that. Also making stronger infusions let’s you use less of them to get the same dose, which can improve flavor. So amounts are a suggestion and cannabis cooks should always take the amounts given in ANY recipe with a grain of salt and adjust upwards or downwards according to their own needs. My free dosing class can help you do that.
Full article reprinted with permission from America's Test Kitchen. The piece originally appeared online at the Cook's Science website. Author Andy Wright is a writer based out of San Francisco. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Matter, Popular Mechanics, Atlas Obscura, Pacific Standard and other publications. She is the former deputy editor of Modern Farmer. Learn more at her website, Twitter and Instagram.
There are two main ways to achieve this objective; juicing high-THC strains or consuming an edible made from hemp derived CBD. We’ve written the guide to juicing cannabis here – all you need is some fresh plant material. If you don’t have access to raw cannabis plants, we suggest a high-CBD edible like the Full Spectrum Tinctures or Gel Caps from Ambary Gardens. These products are created using a very similar process to the one outlined above, only with hemp as opposed to high-THC cannabis. They even utilize MCT coconut oil for increased bioavailability – simply put, Ambary makes the best CBD-rich edibles on the market and they can ship to all 50 states.
The ongoing mission with The Marijuana Cookbook is to collect and print recipes that offer edible alternatives to smoking MMJ, as smoking does not fit into everyone’s lifestyle. The Marijuana Cookbook will include recipes and directions on how to prepare a variety of medibles from soups and salads to main dishes and deserts – and everything in between.
Cannabis edibles have come a long way from brownies and cookies. Just ask Cheri Sicard, nicknamed the “Martha Stewart of weed” by The Daily Beast, who serves up the most definitive guide to cooking with cannabis in The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. Featuring a comprehensive introduction to the history and benefits of cannabis, a fool-proof guide to finding your perfect dose, and 60 reliable recipes that redefine stoner eats, this cookbook makes eating homemade edibles easy.
A standard dose of a CBD-rich oil begins at 10 mg – or 1ml (depending on the equivalency). However, it’s also possible to microdose at 2.5 to 5 milligrams daily. For more severe conditions, a much higher dose may be needed – and some patients are known to go up to 1 gram per day. However, a daily gram of cannabis oil is a very large amount and the attention of a cannabis-savvy doctor is always best. 
Our products have intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of cannabis infused products. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.
Then, take the tahini, garlic, lemon juice, beans, and cumin to a food processor and grind everything in to a paste. Then, slowly add in your oil, blending the mixture occasionally. Once you’ve added your satisfactory amount of THC oil, you can top the hummus with salt and pepper to taste if you’d like. This delicious and healthy snack is great for pita dipping, chips, or to take the place of mayonnaise in sandwiches. You’ll get a much more intense flavor without the added fat. Enjoy your hummus!
“My parents were a great introduction to the rest of the world, basically,” says Sayegh, who hopes that finely prepared food combined with the capacity to discuss the molecular structure of cannabis will help strip away the stigma of a plant still federally classified alongside heroin as a Schedule I drug. Far from a scourge, Sayegh and others see immense medical and economic potential in the herb.
Cooking is a huge part of the holidays for most people. The main course is definitely important but what would that be without those delicious added bonus foods? Side dishes are always very important for the holiday meals. Everyone knows that mashed potatoes are probably the best part of any holiday. Take, for example, these mashed grapefruit sweet potatoes that also happen to be medicated. They taste good and get you high. With a very simple recipe (on a scale of 1 to 10, we give it about a 3), these sweet potatoes will be a hit at at any table this holiday season.
The new book The 420 Gourmet: The Elevated Art of Cannabis Cuisine (out June 28 through Harper Collins) bills itself as a cookbook, but it's also an educational guide to cooking responsibly and efficiently with marijuana. Author JeffThe420Chef—a.k.a. the "Julia Child of weed"—is credited with inventing "light tasting" and "tasteless" canna-butter and canna-oil, as well as the immensely helpful online THC/CBD calculator, and he begins the book with an overview of the various methods that are key to perfecting marijuana-enhanced cuisine. Drawing on his experience cooking for medical marijuana patients and hosting classes for recreational patrons, Jeff explains how to tailor your recipes and dosing for the experience you want, whether it's soothing, non-psychoactive pain relief or flat-on-your-back stupor.
Put the cap on the milk jug and shake it for 5 minutes, then put it in the freezer for 5 minutes. Repeat the shaking/freezing process two or three times. Now, grab the coffee filter and strain out all of the liquid in the jug. Make sure to get all of the liquid strained in to the bowl. With your freezer set to the highest setting, put the bowl of water in the freezer. Be very careful with it and try not to disturb it too much. The bowl should sit in the freezer for around 45 minutes, or until the fluid begins to form a delicate ice layer. It’s also a good idea to tap the bowl lightly with a spoon. The trichomes are in the water and the most dense, heavy ones will fall to the bottom of the bowl.
These recipes are so obviously yummy that I bought the book even though medication is not a goal for my cooking. The recipes are sophisticated but not overly complicated. Instructions are crystal clear in an accessible and easy-to-use visual and written style. The cannabis specific tips and basic methods and recipes are clearly just what the doctor ordered for anyone wanting to make medicated dishes that taste wonderful. This book full of recipes is good enough to stand alone, and light years beyond the miserable excuses for brownies that used to be the limit in this category. The recipes I made were both easy and delicious.

Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.
In the U.K. I can get 30ml thc oil (unnamed Indica) with 125mg (20%) THC in for £85, or buy 3.5 ounces of 9lb Hammer for around £50. I don’t know if you could hazard a guess as to whether making my own would be more cost effective, but I’m guessing it would be. Chemo fog has rendered me incapable of basic logic skills, but saying that, you’re not my math teacher so don’t worry if you’ve no idea!
High CBD Hash Oil can be consumed orally through baked goods or raw foodstuffs. However, the High CBD Hash Oil is not activated; meaning consuming it raw may not give intended results. Consult a cannabinoid chart to target specific cannabinoids that could help your specific symptoms. If CBDa has demonstrated aid to your symptoms, then you may consume the High CBD Hash Oil in its raw form. If CBD is the target cannabinoid, then you should decarboxylase your High CBD Hash Oil.  To “decarb” the Hash Oil it needs to be baked into something.

The hard crunchy texture of paunut brittle is like candy and great for continuous munching throughout the day. The peanuts mixed with the cannabis can also act as a brain booster and wouldn’t be a bad idea for a snack if you’ve got some thinking planned somewhere in your day. This is one of those high treats that’s so easy to keep eating and before you know it you’ve got this beautiful buzz going on, some pretty amazing brittle. Learn How to Make Marijuana Peanut Brittle!


Hey i just tried the oil in the crockpot method, turned out to what seems like good oil ( have done stove top in past) i tried two teaspoons in a small amount of water for a potency test but havent had any real results ( used about 2 1/2 cups of trimmings and small buds to 1 cup oil) im just curious is that possible to the way ive ingested it? Would baking into something and trying that be a better “strength” test? Thanks!
I like this book and Cheri Sicard is like a weed wizard. Very helpful for a medical marijuana patient who is trying to learn to cook with weed. Only problem is I am having a hard time trying to determine the THC level for a tincture I made and the formula for dosing doesn't seem to give me a correct % for the amount of weed used and Everclear alcohol. BTW 95% Everclear is way too strong alcohol content. I would look to a less concentrated alcohol for future tinctures.
Because cooks use cannabis for its chemical effects, not just as a seasoning, a field of homespun, and increasingly more professional, technology has grown around it. Techniques for refining the plant matter into usable and potent ingredients range from stovetop simple to serious industrial processing—all in the quest to make bioavailable, accurately dosed dishes that also taste good.

For example, if you are planning to prepare 30 cookies with your full gram of wax that has 65% (650 mg) THC, then you’ll simply divide 650mg by 30, yielding 21.7mg (approx.. 22mg) per each cookie—which is a little higher than what some states allow for sale. This is a high amount for inexperienced users. If you’re not entirely sure, it is a good idea to start on the low end and mix in less, or even half of your concentrate until you arrive at a comfortable euphoria.


Cannabis infused cooking oils, commonly referred to as canna oils, are popular among many medical marijuana patients and caregivers looking to infuse everything from salad dressings to dipping sauces to baked goods. Most oils are vegan-friendly and extremely easy to add into recipes with savory meals like steak or chicken. Additionally, infused cooking oils may serve as a healthy substitute for butter in many recipes. These factors make marijuana-infused cooking oils a must-have for most medical marijuana patients when it comes to cooking with cannabis at home. How to Make Cannabis Infused Cooking Oil (Canna Oil) Ingredients 6 cups extra …
Perfecting the ultimate balance between sweet and spicy, ginger cookies have long been a wintertime favourite. If you’re using cannabis infused butter, make the recipe as is. However, if you’re adding your cannabis oil directly, you may want to slightly reduce the amount of (non-infused) butter you are using to maintain the correct amount of moisture. This recipe makes two dozen medium-sized cookies, so you’ll need to add that many doses of oil during the butter and molasses stage. All of the spice amounts here can be reduced or increased based on your preference. If you don’t have all of these spices on hand, using a pre-blended pumpkin pie spice will work almost as well (maybe with a little extra ground ginger added for good measure).
Edibles provide a way to consume your hash oil that affords the opportunity to activate the psychoactive cannabinoids.  You need only put your hash oil into your edible at the right time and temperature if you have some cooking expertise.  If you don’t, you can still enjoy great edibles.  Just prepare some hash oil butter first, then add to your food as you choose.
For example, if you are planning to prepare 30 cookies with your full gram of wax that has 65% (650 mg) THC, then you’ll simply divide 650mg by 30, yielding 21.7mg (approx.. 22mg) per each cookie—which is a little higher than what some states allow for sale. This is a high amount for inexperienced users. If you’re not entirely sure, it is a good idea to start on the low end and mix in less, or even half of your concentrate until you arrive at a comfortable euphoria.
The first step is to infuse the olive oil with cannabis. Using the cheesecloth and the twine, wrap the cannabis up in to a little bundle. Make sure the bundle is secure so that none of the cannabis gets in to the oil. Put the oil in to a pot and toss in the cheesecloth cannabis bundle. Put a cover on the pot and allow the oil to simmer on low heat for about 24 hours. When the 24 hours is up, remove the bundle while wearing gloves (be careful, it may be hot). Squeeze out the leftover oil, as a lot will get trapped in the ground cannabis inside. Put the now cannabis infused oil back on the stove and slowly add in the beeswax. As the wax melts, be sure to have your jars set up on the side, ready for the finished mixture. After the wax has completely melted, stir in the vitamin E and the Arnica oil. Keep in mind that once this mix is removed from the heat source, it will begin to solidify so very quickly take it from the stove and move it in to the jars. Leave the jars uncovered to set overnight.

Cooking at home with cannabis does not have to be a game of Russian Roulette. It is important, especially if trying a new recipe, to test the octane! Check out how strong your infused oil is on yourself. Just take a small teaspoon of your newly infused fat as a personal dose. Wait an hour. This will help you determine how strong the batch is. Then use accordingly.
×