Once you’ve infused your oil, it’s time to strain out the plant material. Cheesecloth is often recommended because it allows oil to pass through while separating it from the ground plant material, but only if you let gravity do the straining for you. Don’t squeeze the cheesecloth to get every drop of oil out. Milking it like this will push out a little more oil but a lot more plant material.
In a legal state, home cooks have access not only to lab-tested fresh product but sometimes also to lab-tested butters and oils. Some who prefer to infuse at home rely on online potency calculators, of which there are several. Sites like Wikileaf catalog the potency of different strains, and home potency-testing tools are starting to hit the market.
If you plan on using it immediately, obviously you’ll want a recipe ready. Simply use the cannabis oil to replace part of the oil called for in the recipe. Since you don’t know what the potency is, make sure you start low and go slow with your first couple of culinary creations. You can start with maybe a half to one ounce of oil until you feel comfortable with the strength.
For those who prefer to avoid smoking or vaporizing cannabis, cannabis infused edibles are a great solution. In fact edibles represent one of the fastest growing product categories among medical and recreational dispensaries nationally. Nearly 5 million edible products were sold in Colorado alone in 2014. For those living in less tolerant states, you can make your own edibles at home with surprising ease. In this guide we will cover how to make edibles, how to determine dosage, and why the high associated with edibles feels so strong.

If CBDa is your target cannabinoid you do not need to simmer the High CBD Hash Oil or need to refrigerate it. It can instead be extracted by allowing a mixture of High CBD Hash Oil and canola oil to rest for 1 week at room temperature in a jar with occasional stirring. This method ensures that no heat will activate any cannabinoids and will remain a rawfood. 1 cup coconut oil to 1g High CBD Hash Oil would yield 62.5 mg cannabinoids per tablespoon or about 20 mg cannabinoids per teaspoon. Use the same rule as described above and add non-infused oil to fill out any recipe for oil.

Extracts, or concentrates, are exactly what they sound like—products with high levels of THC that are made from cannabis by a number of methods, from sifting buds to isolate cannabinoid-rich trichomes,to supercritical CO2 extraction, which uses carbon dioxide at very high pressures to pull cannabinoids from the plant. (This professional technique is a popular way to decaffeinate coffee.) There is a dizzying array of extracts available, as well as ways to consume them, from vaporizing to smoking them atop traditional bud. And some have found their way into the kitchen.
Begin by placing the cannabutter (or regular butter) and the ham in a larger frying pan. Take the eggs that you have ready and crack them in to a mixing bowl, making sure to whisk them together well, so that all of the yolks are broken. Grind up your marijuana very fine (it’s a good idea to use a coffee grinder and to be sure that your weed is incredibly dry) and add it in to your eggs. This is also where you add in your food coloring, making the eggs green in two different ways.
I’ve smoked for 50 years and I have discovered that including the seeds and stems leads to bad taste and headaches. I would presume that including them in any oil concoction would have the same bad side affects. For myself, I will carefully manicure any weed before I use it in any way. A little great stuff (buds without seeds) is better than a bunch of nasty tasting all-inclusive smoke. IMHO
I followed Wolf into a back room, where Mary was at work, wearing a green apron decorated with the Laurie & MaryJane logo. They’d been hired to provide the desserts for a cannabis dinner party, and Mary was testing some miniature pumpkin pies. She pulled a baking sheet full of pies from a cooling rack. “I used one of Laurie’s recipes from the Cannabist,” she told me. “We’ll have to taste it to see if the flavor is right.”
First, take the bud and put it in the coffee grinder, turning it in to a powder. Don’t try to put all of it in at once. Grinding about 7 grams at a time usually works pretty well. Once all of the marijuana is ground up, carefully pour it in. Use a funnel of some sort to make sure that you get all of it. Then, take about 7-8 ice cubes and place them on a washcloth. Fold the top of the washcloth over and hit the cubes with the rubber mallet until they’re almost powder. Pour that in to the milk jug as well. Next, add cold water to the jug, bringing the level of the substance 3/4″ of an inch above where the marijuana level was.
First, take the three peppers and cut them in to strips, about 1/2 inch wide and the proceed to chop the onion in to small pieces. Put all of the veggies (and meats if you so choose) in to a skillet and add in your Cannabutter. You can replace the butter with cannabis infused olive oil, as well, if you want to be a little more health conscious. Sauté everything until cooked well and then serve the mix over rice or noodles or alone if you’d like. As for the leftover oil in the pan, you can pour it over the rice/veggie/meat mix to ensure that you get the most out of your meal! Enjoy your medicated stir fry!
It’s nearly impossible to ingest a lethal amount of marijuana. But people can do dangerous things while under the influence. In one notorious case, in 2014, a nineteen-year-old man jumped off a roof in Denver after eating a pot candy given to him by friends. This and other events prompted the state of Colorado to run a campaign called “Good to Know,” aimed at tourists and others whom Andrew Freedman, the state’s director of marijuana coördination at the time, called “the marijuana naïve.” The Dowd column “was our best possible public-education campaign” about the dangers of overconsuming, Freedman told me. The state has since changed its packaging rules, mandating that products like chocolate bars be split into clearly marked doses of ten milligrams.
Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.

So to take the taste out, you basically have to extract as much of that stuff as possible by soaking the bud for a couple of days in distilled water, and then after that, blanching it. By blanching, you're basically getting a much purer flower to start with and later to infuse into your butter or oil. It's still going to smell like cannabis, but if you cook with it, you won't taste anything. Most canna-butters are usually green or even black. Mine is yellow.


In some ways, cooking with cannabis is just regular cooking, with a few adjustments for taste and technical considerations. The food can’t be cooked at temperatures higher than three hundred and forty degrees, because that would destroy the THC. “It’s been a little bit of a challenge cooking some foods that normally benefit from a really high heat start,” Wolf said. An example is fried chicken, which she recommends topping with infused oil or salsa.

Place peanut butter, canna butter and salt in a large microwaveable bowl and melt in microwave until completely melted, about 2 minutes if using reg peanut butter. If using natural, it will liquify faster. Stir in the vanilla and powdered sugar ( I use a mixer and whip it up for a couple minutes making it lighter). Spread the fudge into the prepared pan, smoothing the top with an offset spatula or spoon. Cover and place in the fridge until cool.
When your cannaoil or cannabutter is done infusing, remove any plant matter by carefully straining it through cheesecloth (available in the cooking section of stores like Target or Walmart) or a coffee filter. Pour your infusion into a container and you’re done! Be sure to put your cannabutter in the fridge to harden, but cannaoils are fine to store on the counter. The most important thing is to keep it in an airtight container (mason jars work great) in a cool, dark space.
If you’re new to preparing food with pot, you might as well start with a cookbook that has the word “easy” in the title. Author Cheri Sicard ran a popular recipe website for years, so it was a natural transition for this marijuana activist to write a cannabis cookbook. The Daily Beast once called her the “Martha Steward of Weed,” and until Stewart herself writes a book — and really, we all know it’s coming — “The Easy Cannabis Cookbook” will do nicely. Sicard thinks marijuana is the “unsung superfood,” and adds it to everything from apple-stuffed pork chops to lemon blueberry scones.
Preheat your oven to 350 F and line a non insulated cookie sheet with parchment paper. Take a knife or kitchen shears and CAREFULLY remove the kale leaves from the thicker stems. Cut up the leaves in to small, chip sized pieces. The actual size of the chip is up to you. I made mine about 1 inch by 1 inch. Be sure to wash the leaves thoroughly and dry them. Some people have access to a salad spinner but for those that don’t, I used paper towels and blotted them dry. Lay the kale out on the cookie sheet and slowly pour the cannabis olive oil over the the kale chips and then sprinkles with the sea salt and pepper, as well as any other spices that you’d like to add in. Place the chips in the oven and bake them until the edges begin to turn brown, absolutely no longer than 10 minutes. Let the chips cool off for a bit and your healthy, medicated snack is ready!
While historians have found recipes involving weed dating back to 15th century Europe and even 10th century India, pot brownies were introduced to pop (or should we say “pot”?) culture in the 1968 movie “I Love You Alice B. Toklas.” Objectively, the most common way to make weed-laced snacks is marijuana butter, but baking with cannabis oil can be even more effective. While these two products have many similar uses and come from the same plant, they’re produced and used in very different ways.

Creating cannabutter or cannaoil at home is a simple process no matter which oil you choose. The trickiest part can be getting the ratio of oil to bud just right. A common canna oil ratio is 1 cup of oil to 1 ounce of ground marijuana. For cannabutter, your ratio would be 1 pound of butter to 1 ounce of weed. Although widely used for many years, the need for so much cannabis in your recipe is primarily due to the high cannabinoid loss that comes with attempting to decarboxylate (or activate) during infusion. An ounce of flower testing at 18% THCa decarbed in your Ardent Decarboxylator will yield approximately 5,040mg of THC!


I like this book and Cheri Sicard is like a weed wizard. Very helpful for a medical marijuana patient who is trying to learn to cook with weed. Only problem is I am having a hard time trying to determine the THC level for a tincture I made and the formula for dosing doesn't seem to give me a correct % for the amount of weed used and Everclear alcohol. BTW 95% Everclear is way too strong alcohol content. I would look to a less concentrated alcohol for future tinctures.
I’ve smoked for 50 years and I have discovered that including the seeds and stems leads to bad taste and headaches. I would presume that including them in any oil concoction would have the same bad side affects. For myself, I will carefully manicure any weed before I use it in any way. A little great stuff (buds without seeds) is better than a bunch of nasty tasting all-inclusive smoke. IMHO
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