Combine all your ingredients in a pan on low and heat for 30 minutes.  It’s important to not let the mixture bubble, as this could destroy cannabinoids.  Transfer the mixture to the refrigerator and let sit overnight.  The hash butter will rise to the top.  Remove from water and measure to know how much butter you have and the strength of the butter.  You can then use this hash butter with your recipes, or even just put it on a piece of toast and consume.  Some people greatly enjoy the taste, while others want to just get it down the hatch.  As with all edibles, dosing is important so make sure you measure it carefully, then try a piece and wait two hours before redosing.

CBD and CBDa, among other cannabinoids have been demonstrated to be useful against many skin conditions and pain associated with arthritis, nerve pain, and cancer. To extract the cannabinoids in the High CBD Hash Oil use either edible methodology described above.  You can activate more CBDa to CBD by simmering the solution on the stove for the 30 minutes instead of being cautious not to create bubbles.

This product may be applied to an “oil rig” for the highest intensity medication possible. An oil rig is a device used much like a traditional water pipe, or bong, which uses a heated element, usually titanium or quartz, to heat up the High CBD Hash Oil to a critical temperature. The oil is vaporized, channeled through water filtration for cooling, and inhaled by the user in a large concentration. This produces a less-bodied smoke that is not as thick as cannabis-plant smoke but equally expansive in the lungs and cough inducing.


The first thing you must do if cooking with cannabis is to activate the THC and/or CBD. And that requires heat. The process you will use to do this is called decarboxylation. This is what will give your edibles the “buzz” you want. Beyond that, however, raw cannabis placed directly into recipes will not allow the range of cannabinoids found in the plant to activate and bind to fat. You will just be wasting cannabis, in other words. And who wants that?

Enter JeffThe420Chef. The Los Angeles–based culinary artist, whom The Daily Beast called “the Julia Child of weed,” has been teaching people how to make gourmet meals with cannabis for nearly two years. A longtime cook and marijuana enthusiast, Jeff was inspired to combine the two after a friend’s mother became sick with cancer. She didn’t like to smoke, and couldn’t bear the weed-heavy taste of pot brownies, so Jeff started experimenting with a wide range of recipes that would deliver the benefits of cannabis without the strong taste.
Full article reprinted with permission from America's Test Kitchen. The piece originally appeared online at the Cook's Science website. Author Andy Wright is a writer based out of San Francisco. Her work has appeared in The New York Times, Matter, Popular Mechanics, Atlas Obscura, Pacific Standard and other publications. She is the former deputy editor of Modern Farmer. Learn more at her website, Twitter and Instagram.
The hard crunchy texture of paunut brittle is like candy and great for continuous munching throughout the day. The peanuts mixed with the cannabis can also act as a brain booster and wouldn’t be a bad idea for a snack if you’ve got some thinking planned somewhere in your day. This is one of those high treats that’s so easy to keep eating and before you know it you’ve got this beautiful buzz going on, some pretty amazing brittle. Learn How to Make Marijuana Peanut Brittle!
Cannabis Now contributor Laurie Wolf sells small batch cheese crisps and brownie bites at Oregon dispensaries. But if you’re not in the state, her cookbook will help you replicate those treats — and tons of others — at home. With elevated recipes for dishes like a tomahawk ribeye and bruschetta with ricotta and peas, this is the book you should turn to if you’re prepping an elegant dinner party. In fact, “Herb” has been called the “the authoritative volume on how to cook with cannabis” by celebrity chef Michael Ruhlman — who won a James Beard Award for his own book — so you know it’s good.
Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.
The number of people who think that sweets are the only kind of edibles you can make with marijuana consistently surprises me. The fact is most any food can be infused with cannabis. In fact, it is usually easier to hide the green herbal flavor that most people don’t like in spicy and/or savory foods. There are lots of terrific cannabis cookbooks on the market to help you expand you cannabis culinary repertoire, including my own Cannabis Gourmet Cookbook and The Easy Cannabis Cookbook. You can also find lots of recipes, both savory and sweet, on this blog.

Burgers are definitely popular in the stoner community. The amount of In-N-Out Burger photos that permeate stoner Instagrams is out of control. Whether you’re eating your home made bud burgers or going to grab fast food, you can’t really go wrong with a burger. Even if you don’t eat meat, you have the option to eat veggie burgers. Now, medicated burgers can be the favorite of stoners all over the world. I hope that you enjoy this cannabis leaf/butter burger and that it keeps you flying all day!


That’s right. Cinnamon cannabis oatmeal cookies. Oatmeal isn’t the most popular flavor of cookies but cinnamon roll is something that most people agree is amazing. On a scale of 1 to 10, this recipe comes in at about a 3 for difficulty, meaning that pretty much anyone is capable of accomplishing the task of making these. They’ll also get you pretty stoned, an added bonus. These will do well at a party or a gift for a friend and they’re the perfect recipe to begin your cannabis culinary adventure. Whatever you choose to do with them, you’ll love the way they taste!
How to make Marinated Chicken Legs with Marijuana… Stoner life isn’t all about snack,s and we do know how to enjoy a well cooked savory meal. Chicken is the bomb, and pretty much everyone on the planet agrees, but chicken that gets you high; whoa!  This recipe is a weed smokers dream meal. The marinade is delicious and penetrates through the chicken legs to give you a burst of moist chicken flavor in every bite. Grab a leg and eat it alone, or serve with your favorite side for complete satisfaction.
Now that we’ve gone over cannabis-infused oils, let’s dive into their similarly monikered cousin: cannabis oil. Similar to olive, vegetable, or coconut oil, cannabis oil is made through a chemical extraction process. There are a variety of methods that the marijuana industry uses to extract oil, resulting in similar but unique products. Most cannabis extraction methods involve a solvent, like butane or CO2—or extreme heat and pressure—to extract the cannabinoids. These processes can be time-consuming and usually involve expensive laboratory equipment. Without proper training and the right tools, extracting THC from weed using certain methods is downright dangerous. Unless you’re using a solventless method, the excess yield—or product that isn’t cannabis oil—needs to be removed in order for a clean, non-toxic final result. For those of us who aren’t chemistry experts, most methods of this process should be left to the professionals.
In many states in the US, a single dose of an edible is 10 mg of either THC or CBD – but some medical cannabis products can contain over 100mg of THC. As always, the stronger concentrations are better to work up to slowly, and to work in collaboration with a cannabis-savvy doctor. After testing out a single dose, most medical cannabis patients are recommended to increase in increments of 5 mg until they achieve the desired effects.
Concocting your own pot brownies has long been a haphazard and inexact science for recreational stoners—instructions will vary on the amount of bud and method of infusion, and often DIY cannabis cooks pay no mind to the potency of the strain they're using. And while residents living in states where medical marijuana is legalized can buy a wide-range of dank, delicious edibles from dispensaries, the average pot enthusiast is more likely to dump an ounce of mids into some brownie batter than whip up something digestible if left to his own devices in an amateur cannabis kitchen.
Step 10: After about 5 hours, the butter will solidify and some of the water will turn to ice. Take each container one by one over to the sink, take off the lid, and with one hand supporting the ice block, turn container upside down and release. Some water will come pouring out, and the ice just needs to be scraped away from the main butter block. You should be left with a smooth, round slab of light green butter.
Topicals don’t make it into your bloodstream, just into your cannabinoid receptors, and can be great for localized pain. Under the Access to Cannabis for Medical Purposes Regulations (ACMPR) in Canada, licensed producers of medical cannabis can’t currently manufacture or distribute topicals – but with the distribution of oils, it’s possible for you to make your own (with carrier oils and other bases for creams.)
Basil traveled from Chicago to attend Feast and signed up for the Sugar High class because he’s “just fascinated by the whole phenomenon of edibles,” he said. He’s never cooked with cannabis before but figured if he came to Portland, a city known for pot, he might be able to pick up a few pointers. A carpenter by trade, Basil has dealt with carpel tunnel problems in both hands for the last few years. 

Let's just say you took your weed and put it into a crock pot, like a lot of people do, with some butter, oil, and water and let it simmer. What you're really doing, in addition to simmering all of those cannabinoids into the butter and oil, is also adding in any impurities that are in that bud. So anything that tastes really bad could be something as horrible as insecticides, or it could just be the chlorophyl, which also has a specific taste that's pretty powerful.
One major difference between marijuana butter and cannabis oil is their accessibility. In states where marijuana is legal, cannabis oil can be readily found at nearly any dispensary. In one-gram packages, cannabis oil comes in a plethora of consistencies, including shatter, wax, crumble, cake batter, sauce, diamonds, and more. While dispensaries in legal states aren’t hard to find, marijuana butter can be. While many shops carry a mass-produced industrial edible marijuana oil or butter product, other shops only carry smokable cannabis oil and traditional bud. It can be a niche product, and I’d suggest calling ahead to check availability. As someone with the privilege to access legal weed, I’ve still found the most consistent way to have marijuana butter is to make it myself. For those in less marijuana-friendly states, cannabis oil can be impossible to find and using the traditional method of making a personal batch of weed butter is their best bet for experiencing edibles this 4/20.
Many people know to decarboxylate cannabis in the oven first, but it’s worth noting here for anyone who doesn’t know or doesn’t see the point in doing so. You can skip this step and add your raw cannabis to the slow cooker to decarb in the oil, but you might find that this longer oil soak simply worsens the taste of your cannabis oil. It’s also more difficult to control the temperature in a slow cooker and you risk burning off essential cannabinoids, but in an oven, you can set the temperature low and keep it steady.
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