For some reason the majority of internet sites tell people to finely grind the marijuana being used to infuse marijuana butter or cannabis oil. There is even a commercially made electronic gadget for making marijuana butter that includes a built in electric grinder. I have never understood this advice. If you want better tasting edibles, DO NOT FINELY GRIND THE MARIJUANA! What you are trying the extract, the plant’s resinous trichomes, are ON the buds and leaves not IN them! All grinding accomplishes is to put more plant material into the finished product which in turn increases green color and unwanted herbal flavors.

All cannabis oil packaging must also state the percentage of THC and CBD in the oil (so you know how potent and psychotropic it is before you use it). Just like strains of dried cannabis, oils can have stronger concentrations of CBD, THC, or be more balanced, and thus create very different experiences. Not all oils are created equal – so reading the packaging is crucial for your first time. 
Cooking with premade concentrates is also an art that takes a little practice to get right. Cooking with kief is fun and easy. Its fine texture dissolves almost instantly in liquids and fats, sometimes even at room temperature. Hash, however, will take a little preparation, and this also depends on its consistency. Dry hash can be put in a food processor to grind it. The sticky variety needs to be heated until it melts.
Here is another cookbook focusing on sweet confections laced with cannabis, but this time taking a more high-end approach. Sweet Mary Jane was written by Karin Lazarus owner of Sweet Mary Jane bakery in boulder, Colorado. Sweet Mary Jane is one of the first legal cannabis themed bakeries in the united States, and focuses on making the highest quality and best tasking baked treats with medicinal cannabis doses in each bite.

Help! I am looking for a way to use BHO in cooking. I don’t know the ratios. I have made cannabutter many times and made BHO, but I’ve never cooked with it. One ounce of bud to pound of butter and the edibles are good and strong. I have one gram of BHO from the same bud and would love to cook with it. I know it will be so much stronger so I am not sure how to use in a recipe. Your help is appreciated! –Chiefing Chef
The first chapter of the book is the basic recipes, such as THC oil, cannabutter, tinctures, glycerites, marijuana flour, etc. This is the most important and most useful section of the book. Much like the five French mother sauces, once you've figured out how to make these base items, the rest of the book is pretty much the same as any other cookbook. In fact, you could probably adapt just about anything you'd find in the Joy of Cooking by replacing the oil or butter with an infused version.
“When a person eats marijuana product they may not feel anything for a while,” says Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego. “And if they were doing it medicinally, they may say, ‘Well, maybe I didn’t have enough,’ and take some more, and then two hours later they’re very, very stoned.”
Drummer, like many cannabis chefs, works closely with a trusted supplier that tests its products for potency in labs. Once she creates a butter or an oil, she then has that product tested. Finally, diners are presented with menus that describe the dosage of each dish. She tries to keep four-course menus at “well under” 60 milligrams of THC, spread out over a leisurely meal so that diners can indulge. For comparison, “legal state” Colorado considers 10 milligrams to be a single dose. The effect of a single dose varies from person to person, and from smoking to eating.
Marijuana butter and cannabis-infused oil can be ingested in a variety of ways. Once you’ve created the product, it can be used as a cooking ingredient for any recipe—minding that most baked goods work best with butter. However, one thing to consider is the temperature of the dish you’re preparing—heating the marijuana butter or oil to temperatures exceeding 245 degrees Fahrenheit will burn the THC. For a more simple application, the butter can be used as a spread on toast or even just dosed orally by itself. Some choose cannabis-infused oil as a medicinal ingredient in topical salves, lotions, and ointment, as it can be absorbed through the skin once it has gone through the decarboxylation process.
Pros: It is impossible for our bodies to feel high off of skin contact with cannabis infused oil so any psychoactivity associated with THC will not be felt by the user. However, every bit of the medicine is available to the body. Human skin absorbs up to 90% of what it comes in contact with (hence reapplication of sunscreen) so the medicine is immediately available and fast acting.
Edibles provide a way to consume your hash oil that affords the opportunity to activate the psychoactive cannabinoids.  You need only put your hash oil into your edible at the right time and temperature if you have some cooking expertise.  If you don’t, you can still enjoy great edibles.  Just prepare some hash oil butter first, then add to your food as you choose.
Once your wings have been chilling in the fridge and you’re ready to bake them preheat your oven to *425 degrees. Lightly grease a cookie sheet with olive oil or cooking spray and set aside.  Melt a ½ cup of cannabis butter on low heat. Once your cannabis butter is melted turn heat off and whisk in ½ cup of hot sauce. Separate your hot sauce and cannabis butter mixture equally into 2 separate small bowls and set aside.
No! Not fir vaping. You never vape anything with cooking oil. If you want to vape straight rising…buy a vaporizer like a YOCAN EVOLVE PLUS. IF u want to make ejuice…without nicotine…you need to buy vg…..vegetable glycerine and small bottle if pg. Google it. Any vape supply sells it. U can get a liter of vg or pg for about 10.00. only safe way to vape. Vg and of vaporizes at high temps. If u Vaped oil…..cooking oil….you are basically putting hot oil in your lungs and it will stuck to hair follicals in lungs…would basically clog up your lungs and your lungs could not function or filter normally.

Now, Sayegh works with lab-produced extracts. Though they’re mostly fat-soluble, he says the lab he works with also produces a water-soluble version using a proprietary method. He’s tight-lipped about exactly how the water-soluble extract works, but says it “helps keep the integrity” of the THC “without burning it off,” and means he can infuse frozen meals that can withstand the oven and microwave—something he does especially for critically ill patients, in collaboration with a nutritionist.
Performing the infusion at 150degF helps get the THCa, CBDa, and the rest of the cannabinoids into the oil. But that temp is too low to break up the THCa into THC and CO2. So I am able to do the decarb during baking. I find a brownie mix that needs 1/2 cup oil (which works for the proportions of ingredients that I use) and bake the brownies at 240degF for 1 hour 10 minues. (The extra 10 minutes just seems to help bake the brownies…but isn’t long enough to affect the decarbing “thermal history”).
Take Viceland’s Bong Appétit, by far the biggest hit of the genre. Last year, it was nominated for a James Beard award, a top honor in the cooking world. The first two seasons featured dreamy sequences about sourcing local ingredients, bite-sized lessons in how to infuse various fats and oils with marijuana and, at the end of each episode, a giggle-ridden dinner party populated by the kind of chill stoners who would never judge you for being too high. (I found this out when I appeared on an episode that aired last summer.)
Begin by placing the cannabutter (or regular butter) and the ham in a larger frying pan. Take the eggs that you have ready and crack them in to a mixing bowl, making sure to whisk them together well, so that all of the yolks are broken. Grind up your marijuana very fine (it’s a good idea to use a coffee grinder and to be sure that your weed is incredibly dry) and add it in to your eggs. This is also where you add in your food coloring, making the eggs green in two different ways.
In the microwave, melt the last two cups of chocolate chips and butter. When the mixture is smooth, drop a few of the frozen balls in at a time and stir vigorously. Quickly remove the balls and place on a wax paper lined cookie sheet. Let them cool and harden, then wrap them or eat them as desired. You can buy fancy wrappings for these and use them as stocking stuffers or you can eat them yourself or even serve them at parties! Enjoy!

Once solidified, you now have awesome medicate lollipops that you can take everywhere you go! Remember, the amount of tincture in this recipe can be changed but you should always note that eating cannabis effects people differently than smoking. Therefore, be sure to test out the amount of THC you eat before just dumping your whole stash in to the mix!


Disclaimer: This is not intended as medical advice. I’m not a doctor. I’m also not a lawyer and can’t defend you if you get busted trying to make this recipe in a state that still considers possession or cultivation of cannabis a criminal act. I don’t agree with this law, but I’d never advocate that you break it. Jail would suck. Instead, I strongly advise that you work to change the law in your state or nation by supporting and being active in grassroots organizations that are trying to legalize cannabis in your area (they’re everywhere). This recipe is heretoforth only intended for people who live in states or countries where medical or recreational use of cannabis is legal, who are 21 and older, of sound mind and who understand that operating heavy machinery (cars, trucks, planes, etc.) under the influence of any intoxicant, including marijuana, is incredibly dangerous, immature, and wholly stupid. Please don’t ever eat and drive. Support public transportation or use the two legs that evolution gave you and walk your sweet ass wherever it is that you need to go.
Two of the early taste-testers were her son, Nick, and his wife, Mary. Growing up, Nick was not a marijuana user. “I was a pure DARE kid,” he told me. His mother was disappointed—which was probably the point. “I was, like, ‘Come on! A little pot,’ ” Wolf said. “We were terrified that he was going to become a Republican.” Mary grew up in Oklahoma, where her father was an Episcopal priest. She met Nick while working in marketing for a financial firm in New York. When Wolf began making her almond treats, she gave the couple a few samples, along with a cookie from another baker. They made the mistake of eating the entire cookie before deboning a chicken. (They had joined a “chicken share.”) As the edible kicked in, Nick recalled, he began to get the impression that he was deboning a baby. “I was, like, ‘This feels like human skin! I can’t do this anymore!’ ” He spent the night curled up by the toilet. Mary was calmer. “I just left the chicken there and went to bed,” she said. The experience put them off edibles for months, and spurred Wolf to make a low-dose version of the almond bar, with only twenty-five milligrams of THC.
Robyn Griggs Lawrence cares about your well-being. As a former editor of Natural Home magazine, she wrote a number of books on healthy living before making her foray into the culinary cannabis world. Her “Cannabis Kitchen Cookbook,” which has a foreword written by Women Grow co-founder Jane West, gathers wholesome recipes and tips from chefs across the country on making edibles that are vegan, vegetarian, raw and gluten-free. The book includes cameos from Scott Durrah, a co-found of Denver cannabis cooking company Simply Pure, and Catjia Redfern, co-founder of MegaMints, among others.
All of this has produced a new category of cannabis user: people trying it for the first time, to see what the fuss is about, or coming back to it after a decades-long hiatus. Businesspeople see a future in which cannabis is part of a functional, even aspirational life style. Like Julia Child introducing Americans to French cuisine, Wolf serves as both a guide and an ambassador to this world. She was a chef and a food editor for many years, and she stands out as a source of reliable information in a nascent industry without dependable methods for cooking and dosing. Ricardo Baca, the founding editor of the Cannabist, told me, “Laurie represents a voice in the food-and-cannabis space that can be trusted.” Her columns are full of global ingredients and lush food photography meant to attract what she calls “the CB2 and West Elm crowd.” Her books would not seem out of place on the shelf next to the latest tome from the Barefoot Contessa or Yotam Ottolenghi. Evan Senn, the editor of the California-based cannabis magazine Culture, told me that, increasingly, foodies are the target audience for pot. “I love to drink wine, and I’m kind of a snob about it,” she said. “I’m not going to drink Franzia out of a cardboard box. I’m going to buy a nice bottle of Pinot Noir and aerate it and enjoy it. I have the same approach to edibles.”
Hamilton Beach makes a line of slow cookers (pictured in this article) that are great for reducing cooking odors when making marijuana oil.  I am sure the fine folks at Hamilton Beach did not design the Stay and Go Slow Cooker for this specific purpose, but nonetheless they work great. That’s because it has a rubber gasket on the lid and a clamp you can use to keep the slow cooker tightly closed.  People going to pot luck suppers (no, not the kinds with cannabis) love this feature as you can transport food in the slow cooker without it sloshing over.  But for cannabis cooks its beauty is in the fact that you will hardly smell the odor of simmering marijuana when infusing butter or oil.  At least not until you open the lid.  I discovered this quite by accident, but it works.  The Stay and Go Slow Cooker is also a quality product to use when making non-cannabis infused meals.  Check it out!
Likewise, if you ever find yourself with a weak batch of food, eat more! If you make a batch of infused butter or oil that is less potent than you’d like, you can always augment it later by heating gently to dissolve some decarboxylated kief or hash into it before using in recipes.  I know marijuana is an expensive ingredient and the natural urge is to use as little as possible.  But think of it this way, you can always eat smaller portions, but if your batch of edibles does not deliver, there’s no way to avoid disappointment.  I won’t say that you “wasted” the weed as you will still be getting medicinal benefits even if you don’t feel high, but if you were expecting/desiring a buzz and you use too little, then you certainly did not put your plant material to its optimal use. Learn more about dosing at this link.

She decided that she could do better. At home, she came up with a recipe for infused almond bars, using the powerful taste of the almond extract to mask the taste of marijuana. “They had the texture of a thick sugar cookie,” she told me. “Crisp on the outside but chewy on the inside, with sliced almonds on top.” They contained a hundred and forty-five milligrams of THC. She sold them to local dispensaries, where they were a hit. The only complaint: even the heavy users were getting too stoned. You were supposed to eat only a fraction of the bar. “People would say, ‘They’re too delicious. I couldn’t stop eating it!’ ” Wolf said.


Once the butter has been sufficiently infused, remove from heat and gently pour the contents of the pan over the cheese cloth to strain. As the rate of butter flow slows, carefully lift the edges of the cheese cloth from the rim of the bowl to create a ball of processed, buttery weed. Hold the ball against the side of the mixing bowl and gently press out any remaining butter using the mixing spoon.
Once you have BHO-infused butter, Catalano suggests a few easy homemade edibles. Make a quick honey spread for two pieces of toast by mixing a half-teaspoon of BHO butter with one tablespoon raw honey and a pinch of cinnamon. In sauce or stew recipes, use one half-teaspoon of BHO butter for each individual serving size. If you feel like baking, here’s an additional step to a baked apple recipe. When baking a large stuffed apple, use one half-teaspoon of BHO butter for each apple. That sounds delicious! XO
Sayegh is at the forefront of a growing movement to reimagine cannabis in the kitchen, and he’s become known for his many-coursed gourmet THC-infused dinners in a style he describes as “French with Italian and Middle Eastern influence.” But tonight his gingerbread construction—which he’s created for a party benefitting the victims of a warehouse fire in Northern California—is just for show. Sayegh hasn’t lab-tested the village, so he doesn’t know how potent it might be, and he won’t serve imprecisely dosed food. Once upon a time, the menu included cannabis-infused appetizers to appease guests salivating over the off-limits village, but it turns out cocktails are on offer at this party, and mixing cannabis edibles with liquor can make for a “dizzy” experience, he says; he doesn’t serve them together. Guests still partake of his hors d’oeuvres, but they’re made solely from non-mind-expanding ingredients. Navigating such things are all part of the job; complications traditional chefs have never pondered.
Hello from the Yukon Territory. I’m a senior citizen and relatively new to this edibles game. I’ve started growing my own, outdoors, without too much fanfare. My plants (about 1/2 doz) make a few buds, that are far from high quality. All I do is dry my plants, grind them up in a food processor till close to the consistency of flour, and make small cookies. I use a half teaspoon for measuring the batter–cute little green ovals. My niece and I call them “beetles”. I’m happy with the buzz I get, and it helps with a few aches and pains I get from my senior age, but reading here and elsewhere, I see there is a lot more to the science behind it all. I’m also realizing that a lot of you may find it perhaps crude that I just cook with the pot the way I do, but I’m happy with the simplicity, and will probably continue with this method. However, do I deduce correctly, that my finished product will be better if I heat my dried and ground pot first in the oven, for 20 minutes at 250 degrees, before I make my beetles?
I’m also a bit worried about the decarb process. I have an oldish gas oven that is very inconsistent in temperature, it’s impossible to bake a cake in it due to temp fluctuations and areas that get hotter than others. This doesn’t seem like a wise move for decarboxylation as I’ve read that temperature fluctuations can lead to an inconsistent/low THC content?
“When a person eats marijuana product they may not feel anything for a while,” says Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research at the University of California, San Diego. “And if they were doing it medicinally, they may say, ‘Well, maybe I didn’t have enough,’ and take some more, and then two hours later they’re very, very stoned.”
This recipe is super simple and the only other step that you need to take is putting them in the freezer. You have two choices. You can put the whole bowl in the freezer and let them freeze in a large mass. This method is good if you prefer to eat ice cream right out of the tub. Just make sure that you have a good container that seals well. The other way that you can go about this is to roll the mixture in to small balls and freeze them that way. Whichever method you choose, this treat will cure hunger and get you baked!
Melt the cannabis butter in a small saucepan over low heat and blend in remaining ingredients. Stuff the turkey and/or season it with salt and pepper, if desired. Make a small incision in the skin of the turkey. Force a finger through the slit and break the contact between the skin and the meat. Using a meat injector, squirt half the butter mixture under the skin. Cook the turkey according to your favorite method, basting it with the remaining butter mixture every half hour until it’s done. We cooked it on a Traeger grill and it was juicier and more moist than any turkey I have ever had before.
Eating your weed is an awesome way to medicate. There’s no gross after taste, no smell, and you can get really high. These Oreo cookie snacks are simple to make and you only need a few things. Being creative as a stoner not only applies to fine arts but to making food as well. Creative stoney masterpieces out of food is a quality that most people don’t possess. Stoners everywhere love to create their own concoctions too! If you ever have any recipes to submit, email them to [email protected]
Yippy!!! I am new to it but CO2 Hash/Kief is the best thing ever. It took a few hours to process all the shake but I had a lot. I actually used finer micro first 70 micron (high quality), then 90 micron (2nd grade), I stopped there but maybe should have done 120 for cooking purposes. The trim was a bit on the drier side and was blended in a blender first. If you can imagine I had family growing organic medicine then throwing away the trim for five years before I stopped them!

Since I generally like to take microdoses of cannabis (about 10mg or less) throughout the day when I need to medicate, I’ve never really delved into the world of making ridiculously strong cannabis oil or butter. I realize that some people need stronger medicine, but those people aren’t me, and I don’t have the tolerance to test strong oil without getting really really really messed up, so I never did it.

Squeeze and pat dry your thawed wings until you have them as dry as you can get them. Combine all of your dry ingredients (salt, garlic powder, cayenne pepper, onion powder, paprika, pepper, and flour) into a gallon sized sealable plastic bag. Once you have all the dry ingredients mixed in your plastic sealable bag add your wings, seal the bags, and toss until the wings are evenly coated with your flour mixture. Now place your coated wings on a cookie sheet, cover with plastic wrap or aluminum foil and refrigerate for a minimum of one hour. This step can be done the night before which is awesome!
The effects and duration of cannabis differ depending on how you take it. When you smoke pot, it passes very quickly from the lungs to the bloodstream. There is a rapid spike in THC in the blood minutes after inhalation, which declines after about an hour. But when you eat or drink it, it passes through your stomach and intestines to the bloodstream before entering the liver, where it’s metabolized and then spit back out into the bloodstream. This all takes time, which means that when you eat THC, it can sometimes take more than two hours to feel the effect—one that can last longer than from smoking, as the THC is gradually absorbed over hours by the gut, liver, and so on. So, while the experience is different from person to person, it’s safe to say that when you eat cannabis, it will take longer to feel the effect and that that effect can last longer than when smoking it. The lag time can also lead to overindulging.
Heat up your grill on low/medium heat and cut your peach in half. Coat the fruit with the cannabis coconut oil that you have and sprinkle cinnamon over the halves. Put a piece of tinfoil on the grill and once it is warm enough, place the peaches on for about five minutes. They should be warm but not too hot. If they get too hot, they will turn to mush so be careful to keep an eye on them. While the peaches are grilling, you can quickly gather the ingredients for the balsamic vinaigrette. Put all of the greens in a large bowl and top it with the blackberries.
I say hopefully because lecithin will makes fats bind to the water, which is not what you want in this instance. I never use lecithin when making ordinary infused butter, I don’t see a reason. (more on lecithin here — https://www.cannabischeri.com/food/cooking-basics/lecithin-in-cannabis-cooking/ ) So this is my best guess of how to save it. Without the lecithin in the mix it would be no problem, but not sure how this will affect it. Please let us know!
Nevertheless, the column brought up a hazard of cannabis edibles: eating too much can lead to a terrible experience. Symptoms include hallucinations, panic attacks, and paranoia. What’s more, different individuals’ responses to a given amount of cannabis can vary wildly. They’re affected by tolerance levels, but also by sex, age, genetics, and even what the person has eaten that day. Wolf admitted that this complicates the very idea of responsible dosing. “Tiny people can eat a two-hundred-milligram squib”—a powerful gummy candy—“and they barely feel it. Then there are three-hundred-pound men who eat one of our brownies, which have a five- to ten-milligram THC dose, and it wipes them out.” Since the effects of edibles take a long time to kick in—anywhere from thirty minutes to two hours on average—it’s easy for novice users to overindulge, resulting in horror stories along the lines of those described in a tweet by the comedian Bill Dixon:
“Bulletproof coffee”, coffee with unsalted butter or coconut oil in place of cream or milk, has exploded in popularity over the past few years. It’s a staple in paleo and keto diets and many vegans enjoy the coconut oil version. Of course, mixing in cannabutter or cannabis coconut oil is a great way to get the perceived benefits of bulletproof coffee along with a healthy dose of THC. Stir into your favorite brew, or put it in the blender for a frothy morning drink.
As we discussed earlier, kief and hash can range from dry and crumbly to sticky and gummy.  Many smokers prefer the latter, but for cooking purposes, the dry, crumbly, powdery stuff is often easiest to work with because it is easy to grind which then allows you to stir the fine powder into all kinds of foods, something impossible to do with the gummy type of hash.  If you plan on dissolving the hash in a hot liquid, however, either type will work fine. Learn more about dealing with the various consistencies of hash and kief at this link.
Let's just say you took your weed and put it into a crock pot, like a lot of people do, with some butter, oil, and water and let it simmer. What you're really doing, in addition to simmering all of those cannabinoids into the butter and oil, is also adding in any impurities that are in that bud. So anything that tastes really bad could be something as horrible as insecticides, or it could just be the chlorophyl, which also has a specific taste that's pretty powerful.
I’ve smoked for 50 years and I have discovered that including the seeds and stems leads to bad taste and headaches. I would presume that including them in any oil concoction would have the same bad side affects. For myself, I will carefully manicure any weed before I use it in any way. A little great stuff (buds without seeds) is better than a bunch of nasty tasting all-inclusive smoke. IMHO
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