I make lozenges using kief, which are brought up to 300 degrees over the course of 40 minutes to make into candy. Not fat or alcohol used, only sugar and corn syrup. Curious about making simple syrup for sodas the same way. Amy thoughts about temp/time needed to decarb kief in a recipe itself so I can avoid a decarb step? Wondering if boiling in a simple syrup (so around 220 degrees) for 5-10 minutes would do it
I can speculate that maybe what you are seeing is small plant matter particulates that are settling, because in theory the heat should have emulsified the oils together. If this is the case you could use a fine strainer, or just give it a stir and cook with it all. If I were to infuse oil, I would infuse with buds or trim using the method at this page
Because oils are slow-acting and long-lasting, it’s recommended that you start low, and go slow when experimenting with oils. They’re a much more concentrated version of flowers and buds and can have some unpleasant side effects like nausea, dizziness, thirst, and a drop in blood sugar levels if you go too quickly. Taking the oil with food in your stomach has been known to minimize nausea.
Andrea Drummer is a Los Angeles-based culinary school grad and private chef specializing in cannabis cooking. Maybe because of her culinary training, the book is short on the science of cooking with cannabis and long on recipes, including some fun ones such as kimchi fried rice and escargot in puff pastry. This is both good and bad, as the recipes for infused stock, pasta dough and mayonnaise are comforting for home cooks, but the book doesn’t give much information about how to work with or use cannabis. (There’s also no index, which is frustrating.) Although Drummer gives bud pairings, as if she’s talking about a good Cabernet, decarboxylation isn’t even mentioned; recipes simply call for grams of “cannabis product.” This assumes a lot, and unless you’re already versed in this kind of cooking, you’ll need outside reference in order to use this one properly.
Seven years ago, when Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize recreational use, Danny Schaefer saw a business opportunity. Schaefer wasn’t interested in growing or distributing cannabis, but he knew visitors would flock to Colorado to openly participate in a drug culture long forced underground. So he founded My 420 Tours, which bills itself as “the original Colorado cannabis tour.” They offer all-inclusive vacations that include pot-friendly hotels, growhouse tours, cannabis massages and sushi and joint rolling classes.
States that have legalized recreational use, including Colorado and California, have reported in recent years an uptick in marijuana-related emergency room visits, because inexperienced users often over indulge. In Colorado, for example, the state recommended dosage is 10 milligrams of THC. But for Schaefer, an experienced user, “that is way too potent for me.” 

Sayegh wears chef’s whites. He’s quick to smile, athletic, with his hair cropped short on the sides and a tight burst of sandy curls on top. His Maltese-poodle mix, MooMoo, is cavorting around his feet. Just a few years ago, you wouldn’t have found him in uniform, but pondering his fate at the University of California, Santa Cruz. He was a sophomore studying molecular biology, homesick for the mansaf and other dishes his Jordanian family raised him on—and a fledgling pot smoker. A budding scientist, he decided that if he was going to get high, he should probably find out what it was doing to his body.
In most instances, oil will rise to the top of the water but won’t solidify.  No problem.  You can use a spoon to skim the oil off the water.  Even better is a kitchen gadget called a gravy separator that looks like a small pitcher with the spout originating on the bottom.  This unique design allows the water to be poured out while retaining every drop of the oil floating at the top.  During the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays, gravy separators are sold everywhere, otherwise find them at gourmet shops.  You can also find extra large gravy separators year round at restaurant supply stores.
That's not the way it works. A lot of people say, "Oh yeah, I put a gram of Blue Dream into my brownies and they were amazing." No, they really weren't. First of all, I don't believe you, because if you're going to put the actual ground-up bud into your brownies, sure, there's going to be some form of decarboxylation that occurs, and you'll get some of the potency of the herb into your brownies. But they'll taste horrible and your body most likely will reject the brownies (read: you'll vomit) because our digestive systems are not designed to digest plant matter like that.
I usually cook them in the oven at 325 for about 15-20 minutes, checking on them occasionally. When finished, these incredible treats will either get you super baked or be a reasonably simple thing to make when you’re staring at the baking section in the grocery store. I promise that you’ll love these things, even if you don’t like chocolate (like myself). You can’t go wrong mixing a cookie with a brownie and candy. These are also amazing when served with a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Make these (medicated) and invite a few friends over. You’ll impress them and get them stoned!
Regrind the unground parts. The unground parts left in your strainer need to be reprocessed. If you have a coffee grinder, send them through a second time. If you are not getting the result you hoped for or if you started with a food processor, move the unground parts to a mortar and pestle. Apply pressure with the mortar and "stir" the unground parts to produce the necessary grinding action.
"This book is not a hodge-podge of information, it is carefully constructed to bring simplicity into your life, should you choose to medicate yourself using edibles....this book makes it sensible to experiment with the luscious sounding recipes that would be right at home-even in a non-cannabis kitchen."―Warren Bobrow, mixologist, chef, and author of Cannabis Cocktails, Mocktails, and Tonics: The Art of Spirited Drinks and Buzz-Worthy Libations. www.cocktailwhisperer.com
I’ve found that doing a dry ice resin gland extraction on my plant matter gives me all of the great benefits I’m seeking with zero flavor of cannabis in my edibles. You can cook it into whatever oil you choose, I prefer coconut for it saturated fat which attaches to the CBDs best, and the entire process takes about the same 75 minutes, start to finish. Theonly addition is the 2# of dry ice (~$4) per 1/8-1/4# of trimmed plant matter.
“It depends on if you’re in a state where you can legally access it, or if you’re in a prohibition state,” says McDonough. Most cookbooks and guides provide a way to evaluate the quality of your cannabis and give it a ballpark THC percentage, which will help the home cook calculate it. “It’s better than nothing, but it’s still not very precise,” she says.
I used to be a biter, but my mom cured me of that. Joking aside, I like the taste of weed butter, and I like the taste of food, but the two don’t work for me. I don’t eat sugar or flour, and anything else I cook isn’t going to be enhanced by the taste of weed. And if you make sweets, you can’t eat anymore when you’re high or you’ll make yourself miserable. Why not just eat the butter, then you can eat as many sweets as you like, and just get fat instead of insanely loaded?
Frankly either making the butter the way I described it, or making it the boiling water method is easiest. Making tinctures and oils is a pain, and taste like complete crap. Don’t put raw pot in food as it won’t carboxylate, which is the heating process to make the thc become available to your body. That’s why making butter or oils is the best way to ingest it. You can use it just like you would butter, you can make candy from it, or brownies, or whatever, but why go to all that trouble to have pot tasting candy and food? I don’t find it unpleasant by itself, but I would in my eggs, or pizza, or whatever. I too have COPD issues (61), so I eat butter instead of smoking. The difficult part about making butter is depending on where you are, weed can be really expensive. If you make it the way I described above, just make sure it isn’t getting too hot. If it starts foaming too much, take it off the heat for a bit, turn the heat down a little, and put it back on. You want somewhere between medium to medium low heat depending on your stove. I don’t think this is the answer you’re looking for, but this is what I know. If you want the boiling water method I’ll post it for you. It’s more time consuming, but probably safer since you have no prior experience making butter directly on heat. I used to be a chef, so it’s like making Hollandaise sauce without a double broiler. I’m just used to doing it this way. And one more word of caution, it makes your house stink, really, really stink. So keep the windows closed and don’t have the grandkids over for a day or two 😉
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